pico-rivera-bail-bonds

What Happens to Debts Of A Deceased Person?

debt after death

Nothing about the death of a loved one is easy. Not only do you have to deal with your grief and sense of loss, but it also won’t be long before you find yourself trying to straighten out their finances and learning what debts they still owe. Figuring out the finances and making sure all outstanding debts are paid is stressful, time-consuming, and confusing.

The first thing you need to figure out which of your loved one’s debts have to be honored and which became irrelevant when your loved one passed.

Are You Responsible for the Debts?

While very few debts simply disappear when a loved one has passed, it’s unlikely that you’ll have to dip into your own bank account to pay them off. The only time you’ll have to dip into your own money is when you co-signed on a loan with the loved one.

The money from any outstanding debts your loved left behind comes out of their estate. Shortly after your loved one’s passing, public notices are issued. At this point, any creditors you’re loved one owed money to will have to contact you or the lawyer you’re using and alert you to the amount of the debt that’s still owed.

The Estate Enters Probate

Many people mistakenly assume that they’ll collect their inheritance within days of their loved one’s passing. That’s never the case. When you’re loved one passes, everything is put into probate. At this point, the person who has been assigned to act as executor of the will steps in and starts managing the estate. If you’re the executor it’s in your best interest to obtain the help of an experienced probate lawyer.

The first thing that happens is that all of the assets your loved one acquired during their life are collected and valued. In this situation, the only assets that matter are the ones that have monetary value, such as houses, vehicles, investments, jewelry, life insurance policies, and bank accounts. Trinkets and non-valuable belongings can be distributed according to the will. If there’s not a will, the items can simply be divided between family members and friends.

The executor of the will (or the probate lawyer you’ve enlisted) contacts all of the creditors who are still owed money. The creditors have a time frame during which they are allowed to file a claim. If the claim is valid, the debt is paid via actual cash your loved one left or via the liquidation of their assets.

Ideally, there will be enough money to pay off all debts. If there isn’t, high priority debts are the first to be paid.

Examples of high priority debts include:

  • Mortgages
  • Bank loans
  • Student loans
  • Funeral expenses
  • Medical expenses
  • Unpaid taxes

It’s only after these debts are paid in full that credit card debt and personal loans are dealt with.

There are some things that aren’t entered into probate. These are considered “pass outside a will” assets. They include:

  • Life insurance policies
  • Brokerage accounts
  • IRAs
  • 401(Ks)
  • Payable on death accounts

Once all of the outstanding debts are paid off, any financial assets that remain are pooled together and distributed according to your loved one’s wishes.


bad behavior on flights

Planning a Flight? Make Sure You’re on Your Best Behavior!

bad behavior on flights

Most of us have been on a flight where at least one passenger seemed to go out of their way to be difficult. They were loud, overly active, got sassy with the flight attendants, etc. In some cases, the passenger’s bad behavior was amusing. In other situations, it was irritating. Sometimes it even becomes concerning.

The airlines have decided that enough is enough and they are no longer going to tolerate unruly passengers on flights.

Federal safety officials recently announced that they are no longer tolerating bad behavior on flights. The decision was made after multiple airline workers reported that they’d had confrontations with individuals and groups who were flying into Washington D.C. with the intention of joining the protests/riots that shook the U.S. Capitol.

According to the Federal Aviation Administration, flights throughout the country experienced, “a disturbing increase in incidents where airline passengers have disrupted flights with threatening or violent behavior. These incidents have stemmed both from passengers’ refusals to wear masks and from recent violence at the U.S. Capitol.”

This is not the first time this issue has come up. Bad behavior on flights has been an ongoing concern since passenger flights first became popular. In 2001, the issue was finally addressed following the 9/11 attacks. Since then, the FAA has continuously explored different methods for identifying and quelling disruptive issues that occur both while in the air and in the actual airport.

Just a few examples of this include a couple who were arrested after they got into an altercation about a bag dispute in the Detroit Metro Airport. Another famous incident involved Alec Baldwin who refused to power off his electronics, despite being asked to do so by a flight attendant.

Stephen Dickson who serves as the administrator for the FAA listened to recent complaints about unruly behavior on flights and signed what is basically a zero-tolerance policy. It’s a one-strike and you’re out policy. If you are accused of being unruly and disturbing the peace while you’re on an airplane, you’ll face serious legal consequences. These extend well beyond being asked to get off the plane.

If you behave badly while in flight, it’s likely you’ll be arrested right after the plane lands. You could be charged up to $35,000 in fines and even serve jail time.

At this point, the FAA considers assaulting or threatening your fellow passengers or the staff who is serving on the plane a disruption of peace. At this point, the order is in effect through March 30. It’s unclear if the FAA will move to extend the order following that date.

If you intend on flying in the next few months, it’s in your best interest to be quiet and on your best behavior until your reach your destination.


Consequences of brake checking

The Ins and Outs of Brake Checking in California

Consequences of brake checking

It has happened to all of us. You’re driving along at what you think is a perfectly acceptable speed when you notice a car behind you. Under most circumstances, the other car wouldn’t bother you, but this driver has decided you’re not going fast enough so they proceed to get as close to your bumper as they possibly can with the hopes that it will encourage you to step on the gas.

Some of us can ignore this behavior. Other drivers will speed up. Then there are those of us who decide this is the perfect time for a brake check.

What is a Brake Check?

A brake check is stepping on your brakes, hard, for no reason other than to startle the driver behind you into backing off.

Are Brake Checks Legal?

While the idea of brake checking the driver behind you seems appealing, you should stop and consider the consequences before you do so. California’s highway patrol is quick to point out that drivers who brake check are quite possibly breaking vehicle code 2209. That means you could be the person who gets the ticket.

The problem with brake checking is that most of these instances tend to involve two aggressive drivers. The driver in the lead is irritated that they’re being pushed. The driver that’s tailgating is irritated that they’re not traveling faster. Too often what starts off as tailgating and brake checking leads to a nasty road rage incident.

How you should Respond if Someone is Tailgating you

Rather than brake checking the driver who is tailgating you, you should employ one of two methods designed to get them off your bumper.

The first is to simply ignore them. If they don’t want to pass, simply keep driving until they finally give in and either slow down or work their way around you. If you decide to do this, don’t slow down, which the other driver could perceive as an aggressive move.

The second thing you can do is pull over and let the other driver go around you. Only do this when you’re in a location where you can safely do so.

If the situation doesn’t get better or you feel that the other driver poses a threat, you can call the police and report the situation. Make sure you give them your location, the direction your traveling, and a description of the car that’s tailgating you.


Tax tips 2021

Tips to Help you Get Ready to File your 2020 Tax Return

Tax tips 2021

Yes, it’s only January and your 2020 tax return isn’t due until mid-April, but that doesn’t mean you should ignore that tax season is officially here. The last thing you want to do is wait until a few days before the deadline to file. Turning your thoughts to your tax return now and creating a plan to help you prepare them reduces a great deal of tax season stress.

The key to keeping your stress levels low during tax season is creating a plan of attack. Create a list of specific tasks that need to be completed and determine when you’ll do them. You’ll be amazed how much a solid plan of attack smooths out the process of filing your 2020 tax return.

Gather Your Paperwork

Spend the second half of January and the first half of February gathering up all the paperwork you need to complete your 2020 tax return. The paperwork you need to have on hand before you’re ready to start preparing your tax return includes:

  • W2s
  • Documents that indicate itemized expenses such as child care, medical insurance, and educational costs
  • Any 1099s connected to freelance contractors you hired throughout the year
  • Donation receipts
  • Mortgage interest payment documents
  • An itemized list of business expenses (if relevant)
  • Investment statements
  • Receipts for any tax-deductible purchases you made throughout the year

Keep all of these documents in a drawer or file that’s specifically dedicated to your 2020 taxes.

Dedicating a few weeks to simply organizing all the paperwork that’s relevant to your 2020 tax returns does three things. One it means you don’t have to constantly stop and look for things while you’re preparing your return. Two, you won’t accidentally forget to add something that could impact how much you owe/receive. Three, by gathering all of the documents early, you’ll notice if something is lost and still have time to find/replace the document.

Prepare Your 2020 Tax Return

Set aside a few days in early March to actually prepare your tax return. If you’re handling this on your own make sure you have a block of time when you won’t be interrupted. Give yourself plenty of time. If you find the process overwhelming, divide the process into several small, manageable chunks. By starting to prepare the paperwork in March means you won’t be in a race to complete the work by the April 15 deadline.

When you’re done, save the documentation but don’t submit it to the IRS just yet.

Review your Work

Give yourself a week or two before returning to your completed tax return. Carefully go over every single line and make sure everything is correct. This review process is the best way to avoid making a mistake that could trigger an audit. Once you’re satisfied that everything is accurate, it’s time to officially file your taxes.

Set Up a Payment Plan

If you’re getting a refund from the IRS, you can sit back and wait for the check to appear. If you discover that you owe taxes, you’ll want to set up a payment plan and stick to it. It’s better to make your payments a few days early than to be late.

Hopefully, this plan of attack for your 2020 tax season takes all the stress out of the process, making it possible for you to file your taxes and also enjoy time with your family and friends.


landlord rights in california

What Are Your Rights When a Tenant Will Not Move Out of Your Home?

landlord rights in california

Owning a rental property is a great opportunity to earn extra money while also helping resolve a small portion of California’s rental housing crisis.

While there are many good things that go along with owning a rental property there are also some downsides. One such drawback is when you have a tenant who simply refuses to move out of your home.

The good news is that there are some things you can do.

California law states that you have a right to tell your tenant that they’re evicted when they’ve:

  • Failed to pay their rent
  • When they do something that blatantly breaks the rental contract, such as having a dog in a no-pets property
  • The tenant has done so much damage to the property that it’s lowered the overall property value
  • The tenant is on the property when they break the law
  • The neighborhood has repeatedly reported that the tenant is a nuisance

You can also evict a California tenant when they fail to move out after the lease agreement has expired.

California doesn’t allow you to simply tell your tenant that they’re evicted and need to vacate the premises. There’s a legal process you must go through.

The first step involves sending a formal lease termination notice to the tenant. It’s in your best interest to send this notice via registered mail. One exception to the lease termination notice is in Epp California where landlords are allowed to send a simple 60-day notice instead.

Before you can file for an eviction, you must provide the tenant with a minimum of three days to either get caught up on repairs or deal with whatever contact violation led to the eviction notice. Just because three-days have passed doesn’t mean you can change the locks. Now it’s time to file get the court system involved. The fact your tenant didn’t respond to the eviction notice indicates that they want to fight the situation.

The tenant has the right to remain on the property until the court says they have to move out.

As the landlord, you’ll be pleased to know that most tenants don’t want to get the court involved. Most prefer to leave your property quietly because they don’t want an eviction on their record. That kind of black mark makes it nearly impossible for them to find a nice to rent in the future.

Just because your tenant has moved off your property, it doesn’t mean you’re done with them. They will want their security deposit back. You have 21 days to go through the property and make a note of any damage they left behind. At this point, you have to either refund the security deposit or explain why they won’t get it. If you’re not returning the full security deposit you have to provide your former tenant with a written explanation. The explanation should include an itemized list of deductions that make it clear that the repairs needed match or exceed the security deposit.


consequences of family fighting

What Should I Do if My Family Fights?

consequences of family fighting

Families fight. Some just happen to fight more than others. The trick to weathering family fights is recognizing the signs that the fight is starting to escalate into something that won’t simply blow over and taking steps to diffuse the situation.

Remove Yourself From the Situation

When a fight is starting to get too loud or you sense comments are about to be made that can’t be taken back, removing yourself from the situation is one of the best things you can do. Go for a walk, take a drive, disappear into your bedroom. Take at least a half-hour which gives everyone a chance to cool down. If you’re in a situation where you can’t walk away, you need to do the next best thing which is taking a deep breath, counting backward from ten, and work to mentally calm yourself down. Even this short mini-break gives you a chance to clear your head and reassess the situation. Don’t assume the family member you’re arguing with will be the person who backs down. When it comes to diffusing family fights, you need to be proactive.

Remove Your Emotions from the Drama

You can’t hope to diffuse a family fight if you let your emotions get the best of you. The better you are at staying cool, calm, and collected during the fight, the sooner the situation will resolve itself. Don’t get caught up in the heat of the moment. Count to three before you respond to each comment. Consider two or three different responses and choose the one that is least likely to infuriate the family member you’re arguing with. Removing your emotions during a family fight accomplishes two things. One, it prevents the fight from escalating. It also lays the groundwork for an honest discussion that clears the air and generates results.

Look for a Compromise

Most family fights break out because one person is irritated by something another did. It could be something simple, like leaving dirty socks on the floor, or something major, like failing to pay the electric bill. The best way to diffuse a family fight that revolves around an irritating habit is by looking for a compromise. Once you learn the true issue behind the fight, take a deep breath, acknowledge the issue, and look for a solution that makes both you and the family member you’re arguing with happy. Make sure you honor the agreement. Once everything has calmed down and you’re by yourself, take some time and review the fight as well as what led up to it. Doing this helps you identify the early warning signs of a family fight and will help you nip the problem in the bud the next time you’re in a similar situation.

When the Situation Got Out of Control

It’s the phone call you never want to get: a friend or family member has been arrested and taken to jail. While this can be an emotional time, it’s crucial to stay clear-headed while you figure out your first steps. Of course, your priority is getting the individual released from jail as quickly as possible; however, several things must take place before that can happen. It is extremely important for everyone to remain calm collected during these moments.

Stay Calm and Don’t Divulge Information

First, remind both yourself and the arrested individual to stay calm. It’s important to think clearly as you proceed with next steps. If your loved one is speaking to you by phone, remind them not to say anything incriminating. The phone call is most likely being monitored and/or recorded and can be used against them later. They have the right to remain silent, and they should not divulge any unnecessary information before speaking with a lawyer. You can find out where the person is being held and what the charges are, but don’t ask for details.

Contact Us Immediately

If someone you love has been arrested and you need help now, contact us to determine how to proceed. We’ll work with you to ensure your loved one is released as quickly and painlessly as possible. Family helps family, and that is what you get when you come to us for help. We are a family-owned company and we understand the importance of family. Our bail agents will treat you like one of the family, and provide you with the best bail help available in the state of California. We will work quickly, and do our very best to make the bail bond affordable for you. After all, we want to help you and your family get through this stressful time as quickly and easily as possible.


bail bonds denied

Finding Out If A Person Has an Arrest Warrant

warrant search in california

Whether you’re looking because you’re worried an arrest warrant has been filed against you or because you need to know about a person you’re dealing with, everyone has their own reasons for needing to know how to go about finding out if a person has an arrest warrant.

The most common reasons to find out if a person has an arrest warrant include:

The good news is that it’s no difficult to find out if a person has an arrest warrant. All you need is a computer, a reliable internet connection, a third party website that deals with a criminal history, and some basic information about the person you’re researching.

The type of information you need to have when launching your search includes:

  • The person’s full, legal name
  • Their age
  • And the state they’re located in

The only problem is that sometimes you’ll get information about a different person who has the same name and is the same age. If you suspect you’re looking at the arrest record of someone who isn’t the person you’re researching, you may have to whittle down the search by using a precise address.

Once you’ve provided this basic information, you’ll discover an entire treasure trove of interesting information.

In addition to learning if the person has an arrest warrant, you’ll learn:

  • When and where the criminal offenses took place
  • What types of charges the person has dealt with
  • The individual’s conviction history
  • If they have any outstanding arrest warrants currently sworn out against them

While the criminal history you uncover while trying to see if a person has an arrest warrant is complete though it might be more basic than what you’re looking for.

If you don’t have a solid internet connection and know what counties are involved, you can contact the county clerk directly and ask them if you or a person you’re investigating has any arrest warrants.

The county clerk should be able to tell you if there are any outstanding arrest warrants and also some basic information about the cases.

While you’ll be able to find out if a person has an arrest warrant and criminal history, there are some situations where the county clerk will be unable to provide much information. Traditionally they’ll be hesitant to provide details about cases that involve:

  • Domestic violence
  • Juveniles
  • Cases that involve family law
  • Cases that are under intense investigation

If you are researching yourself and discover that a warrant for your arrest has been issued, it’s in your best interest to connect with a lawyer and discuss how you can quickly resolve the situation.


Rioting consequences in california

Legal Consequences of Rioting

Rioting consequences in california

These days, it seems like every time you turn on the news, you encounter a story about a riot. Major cities throughout the United States are dealing with the fallout from riots. While everyone knows that riots are frightening and illegal, few of us understand what the legal ramifications are of getting caught in the middle of a riot.

If you’re upset about something, you have the right to start and/or participate in a protest. The catch is that for the protest to remain legal it has to be peaceful. You aren’t allowed to do anything that could be perceived as violent nor are you allowed to encourage others to participate in committing violence. The moment you do either of those things, you’re violating the law.

If you incite a riot in California you’re breaking California Penal Code 404.6 PC. You’ll violate this law whenever you:

  • Are actively engaged in a riot
  • Engage in acts of violence or force during a riot
  • Commit an act that results in property damage or results in burned property

It’s important to note that even if you didn’t attend the riot or you left before the police appear on the scene, you can still be charged. If the police learn that you knowingly engaged in behavior that inspired others to riot, you’ll be charged.

If you are convicted of rioting in California, you can be sentenced to a full year in county jail and be required to pay a $1,000 fine.

If you’re arrested for rioting, inciting a riot charges will likely be only one of the things you’ll have to worry about. In most cases, additional charges will be filed. These often include:

  • Property damage charges
  • Resisting arrest charges
  • Disorderly conduct
  • Refusal to disperse charges
  • Disturbing the peace
  • Unlawful assembly
  • Participation in a riot
  • Assault

If someone is killed during the riot, you could find yourself facing manslaughter, murder, and/or accessory to murder charges.

In addition to legal charges, you’ll likely be named as the defendant in any civil property damage case that makes it to court. Even if the property owner doesn’t file a lawsuit, their insurance company likely will.

If you’re attending or organizing a protest, pay careful attention to the overall mood of the participants. If you sense things are getting heated, do whatever you can to calm the situation. If you’re unable to stop the situation from escalating, at least make an effort to work with any law enforcement officers who are present. Your cooperation could be the ticket to proving that you never intended for things to get out of control.


Should you contact your lawyer first

Should You Contact Your Lawyer or Lynwood Bail Bonds First?

Should you contact your lawyer first

When you’re arrested the first two things you need to do is get bailed out of jail and connect with your lawyer so you can start planning your defense. The big question is who you should contact first: your lawyer or Lynwood Bail Bonds.

It depends on if your bail is preset or if you have to attend a bail hearing. If you’re charges are severe enough, you’ll have to go to a bail hearing where a judge will decide how much bail is required and what conditions will be connected to the bail. If you are required to attend a bail hearing, your lawyer should be the first person you contact.

If you’re told how much bail is required as soon as you’re booked, Lynwood Bail Bonds should be your first call. Thanks to our 24/7 availability, we’ll be able to help you out even during the middle of the night when your lawyer isn’t answering their phone.

As soon as we’ve worked out a payment plan and you’ve signed a contract, we go to work and get you sprung from jail. If there is a delay, it is only because we’re waiting for your paperwork to be processed.

Once we’ve posted your bail bond, you’re free to go home. This allows you to get a good night’s sleep, eat a decent meal, and discuss the situation with your family before calling your lawyer.

The fact that you’re relaxed and able to think clearly allows you to tell your lawyer what happened and to also listen to their advice before considering all of your options. Had you stayed in jail instead of contacting us about bail, you likely would have been so stressed that you would have jumped at the first offer the DA made.

Every single person who works at Lynwood Bail Bonds understands that you’re going through a difficult time. We want to help, which is why we’ve created a selection of great services that takes the stress out of obtaining a bail bond.

When you contact us, you’ll enjoy:

  • 24/7 Bail bond service
  • No hidden fees
  • 20% Discount
  • No collateral for working signers
  • Online payments
  • Phone approvals
  • 0% Interest payment plans
  • Free consultations with a bail bonds expert

The sooner you contact us, the sooner you can go home. All you have to do is call (323)357-0575 or click the Chat With Us link. Trust us, you’ll be glad you did!


bad behavior on flights

Should You Worry About Getting Bailed Out of Jail or Simply Stay Put Until Your Case Closes?

Should you worry about getting bailed out

Getting arrested is something that really makes you stop and think. So many things are going to run through your mind. You’ll find yourself wondering what you should have done differently to avoid your current situation. You’ll worry about your future and how the arrest will impact your career. You’ll stress about how your family will react. You’ll weigh the pros and cons of getting a public defender or paying for a costly defense attorney.

One of the first things you’ll have to consider is if you should apply for a bail bond or if you should stay in a jail cell until your case closes.

Why Getting a Bail Bond is the Smart Move

Being in jail can with your state of mind. The longer you sit in your cell, the more tempting whatever offer the prosecutor throws your way will seem. It usually doesn’t take long before you feel compelled to plead guilty, even when you’re innocent, simply to make the ordeal stop.

Taking advantage of a bail bond and being at home decreases the odds of you taking a deal that isn’t good for you or your loved ones.

Your ability to do things, like meet with your lawyer, is severely limited while you’re sitting in a jail cell. Getting out on bail not only makes scheduling appointments easier but also means you don’t have to worry about who might be listening in while you discuss your case.

The California legal system works at an excruciatingly slow pace. Resolving your case could take months. You can’t expect your employer to keep your job available for that length of time. Getting released on bail allows you to continue working so that you can pay all of your bills on time.

How to Get a Bail Bond

The best way to learn more about bail bonds and how to obtain one, either for yourself or a recently arrested loved one, is by contacting Lynwood Bail Bonds. You can either call or connect with us via online chat. When you do, you’ll speak with an experienced bail bonds expert who will walk you through the process, answer all of your questions, and start the process of getting you released from jail.

The perks of working with Lynwood Bail Bonds include:

  • 24/7 Bail bond service
  • 0% Interest payment plans
  • 20% Discount
  • No hidden fees
  • Online payments
  • Phone approvals
  • No collateral for working signers
  • Free consultations

We do everything in our power to make the experience stress free.

The sooner you contact us, the sooner we can arrange for you to be out of jail and with your family. Feel free to call us at (323)357-0575 or click the Chat With Us link.