Witnessing a crime in california

Legal Responsibilities Attached to Witnessing a Crime in California

Witnessing a crime in california

As you were walking your dog, you witnessed a hit and run. No one was hurt, but the fleeing car did do quite a bit of property damage. Suddenly you’re in the middle of a moral dilemma. Should you report the crime or should you pretend it didn’t happen and simply go home.

While no one can tell you what you should do, you should know that if the police find out that you witnessed the hit and run, or any other type of crime, you should report the incident. There are some crimes, such as child abuse, where failing to report the situation could land you in hot legal water.

Why You Should Report the Crime

Witnessing a crime triggers a strange surge of emotions. On the one hand, you know you have a moral responsibility to tell the authorities what happened. On the other hand, you can’t stop thinking that doing so will make you some sort of tattletale, a title you worked hard to avoid while you were in grade school.

What you have to understand that telling the police about a hit and run driver, or blowing the whistle on white-collar crime is not the same thing as telling your teacher that your best friend is jumping in mud puddles and splashing water on everyone.

When it comes to crime, no matter how small the issue might be, you have a moral obligation to report it.

How Much Time do you Have to Report the Crime?

When it comes to reporting a crime, sooner is better than later. Reporting the crime right away prevents someone else from going to the police and telling that you were on the scene and have failed to report the incident. The other advantage of reporting the crime as quickly as possible is that your memory of the incident will be clear, making you a credible witness.

What Happens if You Don’t Report a Crime?

There are some crimes, particularly those that involve children, that you’re legally required to report. Failing to report a crime that involves a child comes with serious legal ramifications. If you know a child is being abused or neglected you are required to report the crime to a child welfare professional or a police officer. You have to report the situation within 36 hours of witnessing the event.

The maximum penalty for failing to report a child is a $1,000 fine and a six-month jail sentence.


What are protesters rights

What Are Protester’s Rights?

What are protesters rights

One of the great things about living here in the United States is that people can always speak their mind. The First Amendment to the Constitution grants every US citizen the right to freedom of speech and peacefully protest. This way, if someone doesn’t like something that is going on in the world, they can speak out against it and try to make a change.

While this law is a great one, there is often a bit of confusion around it. Sometimes people find themselves being arrested for what they believe to have been them exercising their First Amendment Rights. This is especially common during protests. The problem is that some people don’t understand what is and isn’t protected, and so they may overstep and do something they think is protected when, in fact, it is considered illegal.

The First Amendment to the Constitution

The US Constitution is what gives us citizens our many rights. The First Amendment to the Constitution grants citizens freedom of speech, freedom of the press, the freedom of religion, and the right to assemble/petition. This is the amendment that gives people the right to protest when they are upset about something.

The Amendment was a part of the Bill of Rights, which is the first 10 amendments to the Constitution. It was adopted into law in 1791 to protect the civil liberties of US citizens.

Where People Run Into Trouble

The problem that most people run into while protesting is that they start to break laws even though they think they are just exercising their right to free speech.

True, everyone has the right to free speech. However, no one is allowed to threaten the safety of others or to lie or slander other people. Threatening to hurt or kill people is never acceptable and is not protected under the First Amendment. Doing this will get a person arrested, and rightfully so. No one should ever be made to feel like their life is in danger. A protester is also not allowed to say things that could start a riot or other dangerous behavior.

People are allowed to gather and protest, as long as they do so safely and in designated public areas. Some acceptable places to protest include parks, sidewalks, public streets, public auditoriums, the steps of city hall, in front of government buildings, and on private property with the property owner’s permission. A person can protest in any of these locations without fear of arrest, so long as they are not exhibiting any unsafe behavior, such as blocking traffic.

Protesters still have to listen to orders given by peace officers whose jobs it is to protect people’s safety. Police officers are meant to keep people safe. If they are telling someone to stop acting in a dangerous manner, which can include disrupting traffic, disturbing the peace, or risking public health, the person needs to listen or they will be arrested.

A protester is allowed to peacefully express their opinions as long as they continue to follow other established laws. If they don’t do that, then they could be arrested for breaking those laws.

Laws Protesters Can Be Charged with in California

A person can get arrested while protesting if they start breaking laws. Some of the laws that are most commonly broken by protesters include:

  • PC 148: Resisting arrest. A person breaks this law when they resist arrest or obstruct an officer from arresting someone else.
  • PC 403: Disturbing a public meeting. A person breaks this law when they willfully disturb or break up a lawful public meeting.
  • PC 409: Failing to disperse. A person breaks this law when they stay at a riot or other unlawful assembly after being told to leave by a police officer.
  • PC 415: Disturbing the peace. A person breaks this law when they play excessively loud music, start a fight with someone, or use offensive language meant to start a fight.
  • PC 602: Trespassing. A person breaks this law when they enter or remain on private property when they don’t have permission to be there.

Everyone Has Rights

Here in the US, is a person doesn’t like something, they have the right to say so. They have the right to try and peacefully convince others of their idea. However, they do not have the right to do whatever they want while protesting.

While a person is protesting, they must remember other peoples’ rights as well. People have the right to go about their daily lives peacefully, they have the right to not be threatened with violence, and everyone has the right to speak their mind, even if their opinion is different.


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Should You Warm Up Your Car and Let it Idle for a While Before Driving?

lynwood bail bonds should you warm up your car

When the weather grows colder, people begin to do everything that they can to avoid being cold for any length of time. They spend more time indoors, bundle up in extra layers before venturing outside, and even warm up their cars before getting into them.

Many people view leaving a car idling as a great way to keep themselves warm during the coldest part of the year. Unfortunately, this practice can have several adverse consequences. Leaving a car idling to warm up can actually be bad for the vehicle, is a great way to get it stolen, and can even be illegal here in California.

Cold Idling Can Be Damaging

In the thick of winter, the common wisdom is that when you are gearing up to take your car out in the cold weather, you should start up your engine, and let it idle to warm up. It sounds like a great idea, but can actually be damaging to modern cars.

The concept of warming up the engine before driving originally came around with cars that had carburetors. On these older cars, the carburetors created a mixture of gasoline and air to dump into the engine. This method works fine at certain temperatures, but when things get cold, the mixture ratio needs to be modified to remain efficient.

Unlike modern cars with fuel injection, these older cars couldn’t automatically compensate for colder temperatures. This lead to people needing to let their cars warm up to normal operating temps before being able to drive anywhere. Nowadays, cars can adjust the mixture on their own to run efficiently.

The fastest way to get a car warmed up is to just drive it. When a car is idling in the cold, some of the gas in the engine can begin to coat the interior pieces and remove the oil that is supposed to be there to help it run smoothly. This means the parts rub together, cause friction and begin to wear down a little bit faster, making it very important to get the engine warmed up, and the fastest way to do that is to drive it.

Cold Idling Can Be Dangerous

Aside from being damaging to a car, leaving a car idling can also be dangerous. Typically, the only thing keeping thieves from stealing a car is the fact that they need a key to get in and get it moving. If a person leaves their car idling in their driveway, what is to stop someone from walking up to the car, hoping in, and driving off with it? Even if the car is locked while idling, all a person has to do is break a window and then drive off. That is why a car should not be left idling in a driveway or on the street.

Some people may try to get around this by having the car idle in the garage, which is dangerous for a different reason. Cars burn gasoline to create their power, which creates carbon dioxide (CO2) gas as a byproduct. This gas is toxic to humans, and if left running in a closed off room like a garage, the gas will fill the garage and begin seeping into the house, which can lead to death. This is part of the reason why houses are supposed to have CO2 sensors in them.

Idling Can Be Illegal

Lastly, leaving cars idling to warm up can be illegal in certain circumstances. This is typically done in an effort to reduce carbon emissions across the state. California has enacted laws that make it illegal for commercial diesel vehicles to be left idling for more than five minutes. Violations of this law can result in fines, some of which are very hefty.

While the state laws primarily apply to commercial diesel vehicles, some counties and cities have their own anti-idling laws. These laws are typically enacted either to protect people from having their car stolen, or to protect the environment. Basically, before anyone leaves their car idling to warm up, they should make sure that it isn’t illegal where they live.

It’s Best Not to Idle

Dealing with the cold can always be a bit bitter and unpleasant, which is why people often prefer to let their car warm up before driving off in it. However, doing this can be a bad idea for several reasons. It is unnecessary and damaging to modern cars with fuel injection motors. It can be dangerous as it opens a person up to having their car stolen, or filling their house with CO2. Lastly, it can be illegal in certain areas and under certain circumstances.

What do you think of letting a car idle to warm up? Do you still think it is a good idea or not? What about California’s anti-idling laws? Let us know what you think in the comments down below.


Bail Your Loved One out This Summer

Are New Year’s Eve Fireworks Legal in California?

Bail Your Loved One out This Summer

The end of the year is rapidly approaching and everyone is getting ready. One of the big, spectacular ways that people celebrate the end of the year and the arrival of the next one is with fireworks displays. With today’s technology, a person can watch displays from all over the world.

For some people, seeing fireworks displays on television is good enough. However, there are people out there who would rather set off fireworks on their own. Unfortunately doing that sort of thing here in California is usually illegal for everyday people. In addition, there are other forms of celebration that can get a person into trouble.

Fireworks and New Year’s Eve

Here in California, there are very strict laws regarding fireworks. Fireworks are divided into two categories: dangerous, and safe and sane. Dangerous fireworks can only be purchased and set off by licensed professionals for specific shows. Safe and sane fireworks can be purchased by regular people and set off with care. However, safe and sane fireworks can only be sold in the state between June 28th and July 6th. This makes it a bit hard for someone who wants to get fireworks for New Year’s Eve celebrations.

On top of that, fireworks are usually forbidden in most areas. State law prohibits fireworks from being set off in areas where they are likely to hurt someone, or within 100 feet of a gas station. In addition, most counties add further restrictions about what kind of fireworks can be set off in what areas. For instance, many counties, such as LA County, prohibit fireworks from being set off in unincorporated areas. This is largely due to the high fire risk that fireworks present.

Most violations for fireworks result in misdemeanor charges for the person. This means that they face:

  • Up to 1 year in county jail.
  • A max fine of $1,000.

However, in some instances, a person will face felony charges which come with:

  • Up to 3 years in state prison.
  • A max fine of $50,000.

Firing into the Sky

Another type of celebration that is definitely illegal is celebratory gunfire. California Penal Code (PC) 246.3 makes it a crime to negligently fire a firearm. This means that a person cannot willfully fire a gun in a grossly negligent manner that could result in someone’s injury or death. A perfect example of this is firing a gun into the air in celebration.

The laws of physics state that whatever goes up, must come down, and this holds true for bullets. Bullets fired into the air can come back down with deadly force. If they were to hit someone, they could severely hurt or kill someone.

This law is a wobbler offense here in California, which means it can either be charged as a misdemeanor or a felony. How it is charged depends on the facts of the case and the person’s criminal record. As a misdemeanor, a person faces:

  • Up to 1 year in jail.
  • A max fine of $1,000.
  • Summary probation.

As a felony, a person faces:

  • 16 months, 2 years, or 3 years in county jail.
  • A max fine of $10,000.
  • Formal probation.

Have a Safe and Fun New Year’s Eve

Celebrating New Year’s Eve is supposed to be fun. No one wants the fun to be ruined because someone got hurt or got arrested. That is exactly what can happen if someone sets off a firework or fires a gun into the sky. Something can very easily go wrong and someone can wind up getting severely hurt.

This is why the state has enacted laws against this kind of behavior. California doesn’t want just anyone setting off fireworks that could hurt someone or start a wildfire. The state also doesn’t want anyone recklessly firing a gun off whenever they want. If a person is caught doing either of these things, even in celebration of the new year, they will face legal consequences.

If a person thinks someone has fired a gun, or even fireworks, near them on New Year’s Eve, they should report the incident to local law enforcement. After all, it is better to be safe rather than sorry.

When it comes to celebrating the end of the year with things like fireworks, it is best to leave things to the professionals. People should go to a local show or watch one of the many worldwide celebrations on TV or the internet.


lynwood bail bonds why was your loved one arrested

Why Was Your Loved One Arrested?

lynwood bail bonds why was your loved one arrested

You never know what a friend or family member could get arrested for. After all, you never really expected a loved one to get arrested at all. Once you learn of a loved one’s arrest, you may not actually know why he or she was arrested. Trying to find that information on your own can be difficult, especially when your loved one can only talk to you for so long.

Luckily, there are professionals who can help you. All you have to do is contact Lynwood Bail Bonds. For over 30 years, we have helped Californians deal with bail and rescue their loved ones from jail. We can do the same for you. We provide all kinds of services for our clients, including:

  • 24/7 Bail bond service
  • 20% Discount
  • Phone approvals
  • 0% Interest payment plans
  • No hidden fees
  • No collateral with working signer
  • Se habla Español

Once we locate your loved one in the county jail system, which we can do with just their name, birthday, and county of arrest, we can answer all of your questions. We can even tell you why your loved one was arrested in the first place. Once you are satisfied and all of your questions have been answered, then we can begin readying the bail bond.

Our expert bail agents have plenty of experience with bail, and so they can guide you through the whole process. With our bail agents helping you, your loved one can be out of jail in as little as 2 hours in some counties. Regardless of how long it takes, our agents will work nonstop to get your loved one out of jail.

No matter how surprising the arrest of a loved one can be for you, there is no reason to panic. Lynwood Bail Bonds has plenty of experience helping people rescue their loved ones from jail. You can count on us to be there for you and to answer any questions that you might have about your loved one’s arrest.

Want to talk to a bail agent for free? Just call (323)357-0575 or click Chat With Us now.


Avoid Extra Travel This Holiday Season with Bail Bonds in Lynwood

Shop Safely This Holiday Season

Avoid Extra Travel This Holiday Season with Bail Bonds in Lynwood

Thanksgiving has come and gone and that means everyone can officially begin their Christmas preparations. While this means it is time for a whole lot of decorating, it also means it is time to get the final bits of Christmas shopping done.

While this should be a fun and happy time, there are unfortunately people out there looking to take advantage of holiday shoppers. Anyone looking to do a bit of shopping this holiday season needs to be careful in order to avoid becoming a victim of a crime so close to Christmas.

Shopping Safety Tips

While most people love this time of year for all sorts of reason from the weather to getting to spend time with family, thieves have different reasons for enjoying the holiday rush. They love the crowded stores and malls because that provides them with plenty of targets and enough chaos to cover their tracks. That is in addition to the shorter days which provide a lot of darkness for them to lurk in. In order to become a more difficult target and avoid being robbed or attacked while shopping, try following these tips.

  • Always lock doors and roll up windows on cars before going into stores.
  • Avoid talking to strangers. Some con-artists work in groups, one distracts the target while the other strikes.
  • Be aware of surroundings as walking to cars. Thieves like to hide behind larger vehicles, or even under your car.
  • Don’t carry too many bags at once, as this makes a person vulnerable.
  • Don’t dress in fancy or attention grabbing clothes while shopping. This can grab a thief’s attention and attract them to you.
  • Have your keys in your hands and ready to unlock your car before leaving the store. This way there is no fumbling to pull them out at the car itself, which makes a person vulnerable.
  • Hide any presents or other expensive items in the trunk so that lurking thieves cannot see them in the car.
  • If you don’t feel comfortable walking to your car, especially at night, ask a security guard or other store employee for an escort.
  • Park in safe areas, preferably under street lights to increase visibility at night. Also try parking close to the storefront to reduce the amount of time spent walking to a car. Avoid parking next to large trucks and vans.
  • Stay alert to what is going on around you.
  • When shopping in the evening or night, always bring a companion with you. There is safety in numbers.
  • Women should not carry purses with them, as these are easier targets for pickpockets. Try to stick to carrying only a single credit/debit card while shopping. This way, no cash can be stolen and only one card has to be canceled if taken.

Online Shopping Safety Tips

With advances in technology, online shopping has become a very large part of the holiday experience. Since online shopping has become so huge, crooks have begun to take advantage of it. In order to avoid falling victim to these people, follow these tips:

  • Avoid using public Wi-Fi in general, but never use it when shopping or banking online.
  • Before filling out private information on an online form, investigate the company/website to ensure that it is trustworthy.
  • If you have fallen victim to an online scam, be sure to close the associated credit card immediately.
  • Learn to spot and avoid email and social media scams, which become more prominent this time of year.
  • Never give out social security numbers online. No online store will ever need that information.
  • Never click on links from unknown sources.
  • Only go to trusted websites by entering the address in the address bar. Avoid clicking links because scammers love to make fake links that lead to their own sites.
  • Only shop on trusted websites, preferably with “https” in front of the address. The “s” signifies that the website is secure, thus making it more trustworthy. Most modern browsers now display a padlock symbol in the address bar next to secure sites.

Don’t Fall Victim to Crooks

As Christmas draws nearer, more and more people go shopping for gifts for their loved ones. Unfortunately, there are thousands of crooks and other horrible people out there looking to take advantage of holiday shoppers.

So long as a person follows the tips above, they should be able to reduce the chances of getting scammed or robbed this holiday season. Do you have any tips that didn’t make the list above? If so, share them in the comments down below and help out others.


lynwood bail bonds shoplifting laws

California Shoplifting Laws

lynwood bail bonds shoplifting laws

Pretty much everyone has heard of the crime of shoplifting. The crime is often featured in various television shows, especially when teens are present. Despite how it is often portrayed on the screen, shoplifting can be performed by anyone at any age. The act of shoplifting is a pretty common crime here in California, despite the state’s laws against the act. In fact, many stores in the state have to constantly fight against shoplifters, or risk losing money.

In order to try to help businesses out, the state of California has a law against stealing from businesses.

Penal Code 459.5

In the state of California, Penal Code (PC) 459 is the state’s burglary law. This law makes it illegal to enter any residential or commercial building with the intent of stealing something. Subsection PC 459.5 specifically focuses on the act of entering a commercial building with the intent of stealing something. This is the part that focuses on the crime more commonly known as shoplifting.

According to PC 459.5, shoplifting is defined as entering an open business with the intent to steal less than $950 dollars. Stealing more than $950 dollars is considered burglary.

While this legal definition of shoplifting lines up nicely with most people’s understanding of what the crime is, there is another way a person can be guilty of shoplifting. If a person enters a bank and cashes a fraudulent check, they are guilty of shoplifting, provided the amount of money taken was less than $950. The reason for this is that the person entered a place of business, the bank, and stole the money by means of a fake check.

Penalties of Shoplifting

Before the passing of Proposition 47 in 2014, if a person entered a business and stole any amount of property, regardless of total value, they would be charged with burglary. However, the passing of Prop 47 introduced the subsection PC 459.5 to law.

This new law separated the crime of shoplifting from burglary, thereby reducing the consequences of the crime. Remember, Prop 47 was meant to help reduce prison populations across the state by reducing the consequences for many crimes. This is why shoplifting got a slight separation from the act of burglary.

As it stands, breaking PC 459.5 is a misdemeanor offense. This means that it comes with the following consequences:

  • Summary probation.
  • Up to 6 months in jail.
  • A max fine of $1,000.

However, it is still possible for a person to receive harsher consequences for shoplifting. If a person has certain prior charges on their criminal record, then they can face felony shoplifting charges.

These come with the following consequences:

  • Felony probation.
  • 16 months, 2 years, or 3 years in jail.
  • A max fine of $10,000.

The Difference between Shoplifting and Petty Theft

There is one quick, and simple distinction between the crime of shoplifting under PC 459.5 and the crime of petty theft under PC 488. Shoplifting is the act of attempting to steal something from a store. Petty theft is successfully stealing something from anyone, including a store.

In most cases, a person will more often be charged with either petty theft, if they stole less than $950 dollars, or grand theft if they stole more than that amount. California law makes it so that a person cannot be charged with both shoplifting and petty/grand theft. It has to be one or the other for a given instance.

Petty theft carries the same consequences as shoplifting.

Don’t Steal in California

Stealing is never a good idea. The consequences of stealing are always worse than just buying the item in the first place. Fines and court fees can quickly outweigh the cost of legally purchasing an item from the store.

What do you think of California’s take on shoplifting? Are the consequences for the crime just right, or should they be more severe? Let us know what you think in the comments down below.


lynwood bail bonds california loitering laws

California Loitering Laws

lynwood bail bonds california loitering laws

NPretty much everyone has seen a sign telling people that loitering is prohibited in a certain area. However, not everyone knows or understands exactly what loitering means. On top of that, how much trouble can a person actually get into for loitering? Is it a big deal? The answer to that depends on how exactly the person was loitering.

Laws on Loitering Here in California

For those who don’t know, loitering is the act of lingering in a private or public place for no apparent reason. The key to this definition is that the person has no reason to be in the area. This means that if a person is hanging out waiting for someone, they are not actually loitering, even if it may appear that way to someone else.

Most businesses don’t like loiterers because they can scare off potential customers, but as it turns out, the act of loitering in and of itself is not a crime in the state of California. However, if the person is attempting to do something else while loitering, they can get into some legal trouble.

There are 5 different state laws that are concerned about loitering:

  • PC 303a “Loitering to solicit the purchase of alcohol” – It is a crime for a person to ask people to buy alcohol for them, especially when they’ve been cut off from a bar or are a minor.
  • PC 416 “Failing to disperse” – Failing to leave a place after being ordered to do so by a police officer is a type of loitering that can get a person in trouble. This is due to the fact that the officer has asked/ordered the person to leave and they have failed to do so.
  • Penal Code (PC) 602 “Trespassing” – Entering and lingering on someone else’s property without their permission can be seen as a type of loitering that can get a person into trouble.
  • PC 652b “Loitering at a school” – It is a crime to loiter at a school, or any other place where children often get together, if a person has no reason to be at that location, or they are planning to commit a crime such as kidnapping.
  • PC 653.22 “Loitering with intent to commit prostitution” – This one is pretty self-explanatory. Prostitution is illegal and so hanging around a place to commit prostitution is also illegal.

Basically, any time a person is hanging out in an area with the intent of committing a crime that is why they can get into trouble for loitering. It is the crime the person is planning to do that gets them into trouble, not so much the act of loitering.

Penalties for Loitering

If a person is accused of breaking any of the above loitering laws, they face misdemeanor charges. This means that a person faces the following penalties:

  • Up to 6 months in county jail.
  • A max fine of $1,000.
  • Misdemeanor probation.

Most of the time, loitering isn’t a big deal, and as such, the consequences for the various loitering crimes are relatively light.

The Intent to Commit a Crime Is Illegal

While hanging around a place for no apparent reason is not a crime, doing so with the intent of committing a crime is illegal. It is the intent a person has that can get them into trouble. As long as a person has a reason to be in an area, and hasn’t been asked to leave, they are typically within their rights to stay there.

What do you think about California’s laws surrounding loitering? Are they fair, or are they too small for the crime? Let us know what you think in the comments down below.


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Can You Refuse a Breathalyzer?

lynwood bail bonds can you refuse a breathalyzer

With all of the driving that people do every single day, it can be easy for everyone to forget that driving is a privilege, not a right. As such, there are all sorts of things that a driver has to do in order to retain their privilege of having a driver’s license. Most of these things are pretty obvious, such as following driving laws.

Despite the obvious things that people have to do, there is one thing that some people don’t realize they agreed to the moment they got their license. This task would be agreeing to take a breathalyzer test whenever an officer asks.

California Vehicle Code 23612

While people are right in assuming that tests can only be performed on them if they give their consent, they fail to realize that they already gave their consent for a breathalyzer test. Implied consent to a breathalyzer is given the minute a person obtains their driver’s license. Just by getting a license, a person has agreed to take a breathalyzer test whenever a police officer asks for one.

This means a person cannot refuse to submit to a breathalyzer test. If a person does, they are going to face some serious consequences, likely in addition to DUI charges. The arresting officer should warn the person of these consequences of refusing to submit to a breathalyzer.

All of this is laid out in California Vehicle Code (VC) 23612, which states that drivers have given their consent to chemical testing of their blood or breath to determine their alcohol content if they have been lawfully arrested.

Penalties of Refusing a DUIA

Under VC 23612, a person faces the following penalties:

  • A fine.
  • Mandatory imprisonment if convicted of DUI.
  • Suspension of driver’s license for 1 year. A person can face longer suspensions if they have one or more DUI’s in the last 10 years. Can be avoided if the driver agrees to have an Interlocking Ignition Device installed into their car for 1 year.

The other thing to remember with this law, is that it is often in addition to a DUI charge, as well as anything else the officer might charge the person with. This means the penalties can add up really quick.

Refusing Just Makes Things Worse

Refusing a breathalyzer test is never a good idea. Often times, it simply makes a driver look even more guilty than they already are. A person has to remember that a breathalyzer is not the only way a police officer determines if a driver is drunk. They can also conduct a field sobriety test, and make simple observations about the driver. Some warning signs of a driver being drunk that an officer can observe include: slurred speech, red eyes, and an unsteady walk. Refusing the breathalyzer can even be used against a person in court.

Luckily for most people, they don’t have to deal with this law, because they know better than to drive drunk. What do you think of California’s law against refusing to submit to a breathalyzer? Is it acceptable, or too much? Let us know in the comments down below.