Juvenile vs adult

Laws That Minors Can Break but Adults Cannot

Juvenile vs adult

Everyone knows what crimes are and what would happen if they were to commit one. This is just something that people learn over time. However, there is something about laws and crimes that people know, without ever really considering. What a lot of adults may not consider, is that there are somethings they can do without fear of breaking a law, while a minor would face legal trouble for doing the same.

What Are Status Offenses?

According to the law, there are plenty of things out there that adults can do, but minors cannot. This leads to an interesting section of the law where things are considered illegal, but only for minors. This means these acts can’t be crimes, because adults can do them pretty much any time they want. This is why the term status offense exists.

A status offense is any activity that a minor could get in trouble for doing simply because of their age at the time of the act. It is estimated that 20% of all juvenile arrests are due to status offenses.

Some of the most common status offenses that a minor can be charged with include:

  • Being uncontrollable by parents or guardians.
  • Consuming alcohol.
  • Consuming marijuana.
  • Consuming tobacco.
  • Possessing alcohol.
  • Possessing marijuana.
  • Possessing tobacco.
  • Running away.
  • Skipping school.
  • Violating curfew.

It is easy to see how these kinds of things affect minors, but aren’t a big deal for adults. Most adults don’t have to worry about skipping school or following their parents’ rules anymore.

Why Status Offenses Are a Big Deal

When people began to look closer at status offenses, they noticed the alarming trend that minors who committed status offenses were more likely to commit more delinquent acts in the future. This has led to many states, including California, to adopt programs and strategies aimed at achieving the following:

  • Preserving families.
  • Ensuring public safety.
  • Preventing young people from becoming delinquents.

This is one of the many reasons why, when minors get into trouble they receive lighter penalties. The goal of punishing a minor after committing a crime is to teach them that their behavior was wrong and that they don’t want to commit that type of behavior again.

Penalties for Status Offenses

The penalties that a minor will face for a status defense can vary greatly depending on the minor’s record and the status offense they are being charged with. Some of the common penalties that a minor will face for a status offense include:

  • Being required to attend an educational program.
  • Being required to attend counseling.
  • Having their driver’s license suspended.
  • Paying a fine.
  • Paying restitutions for any damages.
  • Removing the minor from the care of the minor’s parent or guardian.

This is just a small sample of what a minor can face when charged with a status offense, and some of these consequences are more common than others.

Minors Need Different Rules

It’s a bit of an odd thought to realize that minors can get into trouble for doing things that some adults do daily without having to worry about breaking a law. However, many of these status offenses make sense. Kids should be in school, furthering their education so that they have a better chance once they reach adulthood. It wouldn’t make sense for many of these things to be made into crimes for everyone, which is why they are status offenses that only apply to minors.


marijuana laws

Can Marijuana Legally Be Smoked in Public?

marijuana laws

Back in 2016, Californian voters chose to approve the legalization of the recreational use of marijuana. The law went into effect at the start of 2018, and so for the last two years, people have been able to enjoy marijuana. However, even though marijuana usage has been legal for 2 years, there is still a lot of confusion around the law.

Two years isn’t a lot of time in legal terms. Many of the laws that people are familiar with have been around for decades, which is why people are so familiar with them. Since the marijuana laws are so new, the general public hasn’t had enough time to get to know every single detail. This is why some people are still confused

Where Can Marijuana Be Smoked?

One of the biggest questions people still have is where can marijuana legally be smoked and consumed now. Even though the usage of marijuana has been legalized, there are still restrictions on where it can be used. When people aren’t aware of these restrictions, they can find themselves in trouble with the law.

The laws surrounding marijuana usage are practically identical to the laws surrounding alcohol and cigarettes. A person can get a good understanding of when and where marijuana can be consumed by looking at those regulations.

Since smoking cigarettes is banned in most businesses and public areas, smoking marijuana is also banned in those areas. Just like people have a right to not be exposed to secondhand smoke from cigarettes, they also have the right to not be exposed to marijuana.

The usage of marijuana is banned on all government property, especially schools. Employers are permitted to keep their workplaces marijuana free just like they can keep them alcohol-free. They also are legally allowed to test their employees for marijuana.

Marijuana also cannot be consumed while a person is in a car, especially if they are driving. A person cannot consume or have an open container of alcohol in their vehicle, so they cannot do the same with marijuana.

The biggest thing to note about the legalization of the recreational use of marijuana is the recreational part. Primarily, a person is only allowed to consume marijuana in places where they would normally relax, such as their home or backyard.

Penalties for Using Marijuana Where It Is Prohibited

The penalties for misusing marijuana in California can vary greatly depending on where the person consumed marijuana. If a person smokes or consumes marijuana at their job, where it is banned, they may not face legal consequences, but they could be fired.

If a person is caught with marijuana on school grounds, they could be charged with a misdemeanor that comes with:

  • Up to 6 months in jail.
  • A max fine of $250 for a first offense.

Simply having an open container of marijuana in a vehicle can get a person charged with an infraction that comes with a fine of up to $100.

If a person is charged with DUI, then they could face:

  • Up to 6 months in jail.
  • A max fine of $1,000.
  • Up to 9 months of DUI school.
  • A 4-month driver’s license suspension.

Be Considerate of Others

It is important to remember that while the recreational use of marijuana has been legalized here in California, it is still illegal at the federal level. This means that even if a person follows all of the rules laid out in the state legislature, they could still be arrested at the federal level. Luckily, this is unlikely to happen unless a person is doing a lot of illegal things with marijuana, or they bring it onto federal property. Some common examples of federal property include airports and federal government buildings.

The recreational use of Marijuana was legalized to allow people who wanted to consume it to do so in ways that don’t bother other people. Most people do not enjoy the smell of marijuana and would prefer to not have to smell it when they are out in public. Then there is the fact that no one wants their kids exposed to marijuana.

If a person is wondering if they can have marijuana in a certain area, such as a public park, they should think about whether cigarettes or alcohol are allowed there. Most parks ban smoking, so that includes marijuana.


lynwood bail bonds tips to avoid scams online

Tips to Avoid Scams Online

lynwood bail bonds tips to avoid scams online

Most people just want to go about their lives without a worry. They just want to go to work, earn a living, and have enough money to have some fun. Nowadays, a lot of people prefer to have their fun and spend their money online. For the most part this is a safe thing to do, however there are times when things can become problematic.

Just like there are good people, there are bad people too. There are people out there who would rather take advantage of other people’s hard work rather than earn an honest living themselves. These people will run any scam they can think of if it can benefit them. Anyone looking to avoid getting conned needs to know how to recognize scams when they pop up.

How to Spot Scams

Online scams come in all shapes and sizes, however the goals are ultimately the same: to con someone into giving up something of value. Sometimes the valuable item is money, other times it is personal information. The money is obvious, the personal information allows a crook to steal the victim’s identity. Once they have done that, they can open credit cards and other financial accounts in the victim’s name, spend the money, and leave the victim with the bill.

Obviously, this is the kind of thing that people want to avoid. Unfortunately, since there are so many different scams out there, with new ones springing up every day, it is impossible to know all of them. This means that the best way to avoid a scam is to learn how to identify the warning signs. Some of the signs to look out for include:

  • Always check the website’s address. Before ever putting any personal information into a website, be sure that the address is proceeded by ‘https.’ The ‘s’ is important because it means the site is secure. Most modern browsers also add a padlock symbol in the address bar next to secure sites.
  • Always hang up on robocalls. Report the number that called to the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) since these kinds of calls are illegal. Trying to go through the call to get a number removed from the calling list could end up leading to more calls in the future.
  • Always research the company or organization in question. If a person has questions about a certain company and aren’t quite sure if it is legitimate, they should research it. If it is a scam, it will likely have a lot of bad reviews online.
  • Avoid shady links in emails or on social media posts. Scammers like it when people go to their websites, because their sites can let them look into the victim’s computer and gather personal information. They may also have forms to fill out for a service or purchase, but they just use it collect personal information.
  • Contact the company or organization yourself. If a person still has questions about a company, they should contact it manually either through calling the number or messaging the email found on the official website.
  • Don’t blindly trust caller or email ID. Nowadays scammers have the ability to hide their identity and can trick caller ID or email ID into displaying a false name or number.
  • Don’t give into odd payment demands. Scammers like to be paid in ways that make it hard to track the money, such as prepaid cards, gift cards, and money transfers. No honest company or government agency would demand payment with these methods.
  • Don’t pay for things upfront. This is especially true for any kind of prize won. Any legitimate contest would never have someone pay some money or give personal information to claim the prize.
  • Don’t Fall for It

    There may be a lot of scammers out there with thousands of scam, but luckily they all have warning signs that a person can spot, so long as they know what to look for. Plenty of people online have learned how to recognize scams and are now sharing that information with everyone else online.

    Have you ever come across a scam, or been a victim of one? Do you have any tips for avoiding scams that didn’t make it on to this list? If so, share your story and the tips below to help others avoid scams in the future.


lynwood bail bonds trespassing at a zoo

Trespassing Laws and Oversharing on Social Media

lynwood bail bonds trespassing at a zoo

Going out and exploring the world can be a lot of fun. There are millions of spectacular and amazing sights to see out there. Sadly, not all of the great views are open to the public. From being too dangerous for the public, or someone just wants to keep the land to themselves, some views may be kept behind fences.

Despite the reasoning, some people decide that they want to see the view for themselves. This sounds like a harmless act, but it can actually get a person into big trouble, even here in California. A person can easily be charged with trespassing for doing this, especially if that person decides to post pictures from the incident onto social media.

What Is Oversharing?

As social media became popular, people began to share more and more of their lives online. This led to problems of oversharing, where people share stuff that would have been better left private. A person never wants to share too much personal information about themselves. If a person is not careful, then they could inadvertently give the people of the internet the ability to steal their identity, or provide police officers with self-incriminating evidence.

Despite what a person might think, deleting something from the internet is practically impossible. Even if a person deletes the post/image/video from their page, someone else could have copied or screenshot it and posted it elsewhere, meaning it still exists online. This is why a person has to really be careful about what they share online.

Over sharing on social media can even get people into trouble. There have been hundreds of incidents of people posting pictures or videos online that show the individual committing criminal activity. Plenty of celebrities have fallen victim to this over the years.

The police are well aware of how much people share on their social media accounts and often turn to those during investigations to look for more evidence. This means if a person shared any pictures or videos of themselves while doing the illegal act in question, then they provided the incriminating evidence to the police.

California Trespassing Law

State Penal Code (PC) 602 defines trespassing as the act of a person entering into or remaining on someone else’s property without their permission to do so. The law goes on to list dozens of different scenarios where a person could be considered trespassing.

In some cases, trespassing can be charged as an infraction. This means a person faces a small fine, whose size is dependent on how many times the person has trespassed onto that particular piece of property.

  • $75 for a first time offense.
  • $250 for a second offense.
  • Misdemeanor charges for any subsequent offenses.

In California, most trespassing offenses are charged as misdemeanors. This means a person accused of this crime faces the following consequences:

  • Up to 6 months in jail.
  • A max fine of $1,000.
  • Misdemeanor probation.

A person can face felony charges for trespassing when they make a credible threat against someone, and then trespass onto that person’s property or workplace with the intent of carrying out that threat. Under these conditions, a person can end up in county jail for 16 months, 2 years, or 3 years.

Don’t Trespass or Post the Pictures Online

Just because there is a good view on someone else’s land does not mean a person should sneak onto the property. They do not have permission to do so and can be charged with trespassing here in California. This becomes even more likely if they post pictures or videos of the view onto their social media account where anyone can see them.

A person should always be aware of what they are sharing online and how that could affect them. Oversharing online is easily avoidable.

What do you think of California’s take on trespassing? Are the consequences too steep, just right, or not enough? Let us know in the comments down below.


lynwood bail bonds dui on new years eve

Don’t Get a DUI on New Year’s Eve

lynwood bail bonds dui on new years eve

As this year draws to a close, pretty much everyone is planning out how they are going to celebrate. Parties will be happening all over the world and deciding which party to go to can be a daunting task. Luckily, the end results are pretty fun, provided a person doesn’t make any bad decisions.

As an adult, most parties that people go to have alcohol at them. This isn’t usually a problem, as long as everyone drinks responsibly. A person should know their limits with alcohol and they should have a safe ride home.

No one should ever drive themselves after consuming alcohol. Being drunk while driving is a great way to cause an accident. On top of that, it is a surefire way to get a ticket and even get arrested. So while enjoying the New Year’s Eve celebrations, people need to be responsible or they will face some harsh consequences.

California DUI Laws

Here in the state of California, just like everywhere else in the country, it is illegal for a person to drive drunk. Under Vehicle Code (VC) 23152a, driving under the influence of drugs and/or alcohol is illegal. A person is driving under the influence any time they consume enough alcohol that their abilities are impaired enough that they can no longer operate the vehicle with the care and caution of a sober person.

VC 23152b makes it illegal for a person to drive a vehicle if their blood alcohol concentration (BAC) is above 0.08%.

VC 23153 makes it a crime for a person to drive under the influence and hurt someone. Basically, if someone ever commits DUI and seriously injures someone in the process, they will be charged with this crime.

DUI Checkpoints and Holidays

Something else to consider when planning holiday parties are DUI checkpoints. Whenever holidays roll around that tend to involve a lot of drinking, such as New Year’s Eve, law enforcement agencies tend to setup DUI checkpoints in heavily trafficked areas. These checkpoints are setup in the hopes to catch drunk drivers before they are able to cause an accident and hurt/kill someone.

DUI checkpoint locations will always be posted in advanced to give people the ability to avoid them if they choose to. If a person comes across a checkpoint, they will likely have to wait in line until an officer is available to talk to them. The officer will ask a few simple questions and if everything checks out, they will allow the driver to continue on their way.

However, if the officer suspects that the driver has been drinking, then they will ask the car to pull off to the side. From there, another officer will conduct a field sobriety test to confirm whether or not the driver has been drinking. If the driver is confirmed to have been drinking, he or she will be ticketed, and either have to get a ride home or be taken into custody.

Penalties for DUI

There are a lot of specific incidents when it comes to DUI. The consequences of DUI depend on which particular incident occurred. For a first time offense, a person faces misdemeanor charges that come with:

  • Up to 6 months in county jail.
  • A max fine of $1,000.
  • A 4 month driver’s license suspension.
  • Up to 9 months of DUI school.

The consequences for basic DUI increase with each offense.

If a person commits DUI and hurts someone, they will typically face misdemeanor charges that come with:

  • Up to 1 year in county jail.
  • A Max fine of $5,000.
  • A 1 year driver’s license suspension.
  • Up to 30 months of DUI school.
  • Paying restitutions to the victim.

If a person commits too many DUI’s within a set time period, or they kill someone because of DUI, they will automatically face felony charges. Felony DUI charges come with:

  • 16 months, 2 years, or 3 years in state prison.
  • A max fine of $1,000.
  • A 5 year driver’s license suspension.
  • Up to 30 months of DUI school.
  • These charges may seem light, but if a death was involved, they are often charged with vehicular manslaughter charges, which carry harsher consequences.

    End the Year on a High Note

    As the end of the year draws closer, everyone is planning out how to celebrate it. No matter what a person decides with the celebrations, if a person plans on drinking on New Year’s Eve, they need to do so responsibly. This means knowing their limits and having a plan to get home that doesn’t involve driving themselves.

    In today’s modern world, getting a safe ride home is a piece of cake thanks to apps like Uber and Lyft. Plus, there are always the traditional methods such as hiring a taxi or just designating a friend as a sober driver.

    No matter what you end up doing this New Year’s Eve, be sure to send 2019 off on a high note, which means not getting a ticket for DUI or causing an accident. From everyone here at Lynwood Bail Bonds, have a safe and Happy New Year!


lynwood bail bonds dui this thanksgiving

Don’t Get a DUI This Thanksgiving

lynwood bail bonds dui this thanksgiving

Halloween came and went and Thanksgiving will be here before you know it. The holiday season is upon us and that means a lot of parties, family, and drinking. This is a great time of year and is usually filled with lots of fun. Unfortunately, some people make a single decision that can ruin the festivities for everyone.

Alcohol is often very prominent at parties, and so naturally, people tend to get drunk at holiday parties. On its own, this is fine. The trouble comes when someone who has been drinking decides they are going to drive themselves home. They think things like they’re fine, or just buzzed, and then take their keys and leave. Sometimes they make it home. Other times they don’t.

Drunk Driving Is Illegal

Drinking and driving is illegal, and everyone knows that. However, people still do it anyways, and it is incredibly dangerous.

When a person has consumed alcohol, operating normally becomes difficult. Alcohol dulls the senses and distorts a person’s thinking. Due to this, when a person drives drunk, they are less capable of driving safely. They struggle to drive straight, stop properly, and avoid any surprises that are sent their way. This is why drunk drivers get into so many accidents.

Driving under the influence (DUI) is illegal in California under several different laws. The main law being Vehicle Code (VC) 23152. This law states that it is illegal for any person to drive a vehicle while under the influence of drugs or alcohol. This is especially true if the person has a blood alcohol concentration (BAC) of 0.08% or greater.

DUI Checkpoints

Law enforcement agencies are always keeping an eye out for drunk drivers. They want to get them off of the road as quickly as they can before an accident occurs. They will pull over any vehicle that they suspect may be driven by a drunk driver.

Around days where there tends to be a lot of partying, law enforcement agencies kick things up a notch. Instead of just waiting to stumble upon a drunk driver, they setup checkpoints near popular areas to try and catch the driver in the act.

DUI checkpoints are often posted in advance to give people plenty of warning and the option to avoid them if they want. At the checkpoint, cars will have to wait their turn to speak with an officer. When an officer is ready, they will signal for a driver to pull forward. From there, the officer will ask a few questions, such as:

  • Where are you going?
  • Where are you coming from?
  • Have you been drinking tonight?

The officer may even ask to see your license and registration. If everything checks out, the officer will let the driver proceed. However, if they suspect the person has been drinking, they will ask the driver to pullover to the side of the road. There, another officer will perform a field sobriety test. If they determine the driver has been drinking, then they will either arrest driver, or have him/her call for a sober ride home.

Penalties of DUI

The penalties for a DUI vary depending on whether or not this is the driver’s first DUI offense, and if someone was injured or not. For a first time DUI offense, a driver faces the following consequences:

  • Up to 6 months in county jail.
  • A max fine of $1,000.
  • Up to 9 months of DUI School.
  • A 4 month driver’s license suspension or 6 months with an ignition interlock device (IID) in the car.

A second time DUI offense comes with:

  • Up to 1 year in county jail.
  • A max fine of $1,000.
  • Up to 30 months of DUI School.
  • A 2 year driver’s license suspension or 1 year with an IID in the car.

When someone is injured due to a drunk driver, the person can face either misdemeanor or felony charges, depending on the severity of the injury. The consequences for misdemeanor DUI with an injury are:

  • Up to 1 year in county jail.
  • A max fine of $5,000.
  • Restitutions to the injured person.
  • Up to 30 months of DUI School.
  • A 1 year driver’s license suspension or 6 months with an IID in the car.

If a person is facing felony DUI with injury charges, they face the following consequences:

  • Up to 16 years in state prison.
  • A max fine of $5,000.
  • Restitutions to the injured person.
  • Up to 30 months of DUI School.
  • 1 year with an IID in the car.

If a person has acquired too many DUI convictions within the last 10 years, or their drunk driving killed someone, they will face felony DUI charges. This includes:

  • 16 months, 2 years, or 3 years in state prison.
  • A max fine of $1,000.
  • Up to 30 months of DUI School.
  • A 5 year driver’s license suspension.

While the consequences for felony DUI are lighter, it is important to remember that typically, DUI’s that result in death earn a person vehicular manslaughter charges, which carry much harsher consequences.

Don’t Ruin the Holidays with a DUI

Nobody wants their holiday ruined by a drunk driver hurting or killing someone they know and love, so it is best for anyone who is planning on drinking this holiday season to do so responsibly. This means that not only should a person know their limit with alcohol, they should have a ride home arranged before they begin drinking. The ride home could be a predetermined designated driver (DD), or a ride share service such as Uber or Lyft. A person could even hire a cab to take them home.

In the end, it doesn’t matter how the person gets home, as long as they did it safely, without driving under the influence.

What do you think of California’s DUI laws and DUI checkpoints? Do the laws and consequences matchup, or should they be adjusted? What about the checkpoints, do you think it is fair for the officers to disrupt traffic like that just to catch a few bad people? Let us know what you think in the comments below and have a safe Thanksgiving!


lynwood bail bonds trespassing at a zoo

Trespassing at a Zoo

lynwood bail bonds trespassing at a zoo

When going anywhere, it is important for a person to be sure that they have permission to be in that area. Privately owned property is everywhere, including public areas. Many people do not realize that places like stores and parks, even though open to the public, are actually private property. The land owner has simply given permission to the public to be in specific areas. This means that there are some areas that can be off limits to the general public.

There are obvious no-go areas such as employee lounges, or janitorial closest. One area that is definitely off-limits to everyone would be animal enclosures at zoos. This should be pretty obvious, but apparently not to everyone. One woman, while on a trip to the Bronx Zoo in New York, decided to climb into the lion enclosure to get the lion’s attention. Now police are looking for her.

Entering the Lion’s Den

At the start of October, video footage surfaced on social media platforms showing a woman who had climbed over the railing of a lion enclosure and was dancing and waving at a lion to get his attention. Needless to say, she got his attention.

Luckily for the woman, despite being inside the enclosure, there was a 15-foot moat separating him from her. Due to this fact, the woman remained unharmed.

The Bronx Zoo was alerted to the incident after it happened. The Zoo officials reminded everyone that it is never a good idea to enter an animal enclosure. Even though the animals are being held in captivity, they are still wild. The barriers are there to keep people and the animals safe.

Zoo officials contacted the police and informed them of the incident. Police are now looking for the woman to charge her with trespassing. This is due to the fact that even though the woman legally entered the zoo, she did not have permission to enter that enclosure.

California Trespassing Law

Here in the state of California, trespassing is defined and made illegal with Penal Code (PC) 602. As far as state law is concerned, someone is guilty of trespassing when they enter or remain on someone’s property without permission, or the right, to do so. Under this definition, the woman in the video would be guilty of trespassing if the incident had happened here in California.

PC 602 is unique in that it can be charged as an infraction, misdemeanor, or as a felony. When it’s an infraction, trespassing carries the following consequences:

  • A $75 fine for first time offenses
  • A $250 fine for a second time offense on the same land.
  • A third offense on the same land results in misdemeanor charges.

When PC 602 is charged as a misdemeanor, it carries the following consequences:

  • Up to 6 months in jail.
  • A max fine of $1,000.
  • Summary probation.

Felony charges of trespass occur when a person makes a credible threat against someone and within 30 days of making the threat trespasses with the intent of carrying out that threat. When a person does this, they can face jail time of:

  • 16 months.
  • 2 years.
  • 3 years.

Trespassing Is a Bad Idea

Trespassing is never a good idea. It’s entering someone’s private property without their permission. As such, a person can get into legal trouble for doing so. Entering a lion enclosure at a zoo is a terrible idea. Not only would it be trespassing, it is also incredibly dangerous. Lions can very easily kill a human.

What do you think of the woman who climbed into the lion enclosure at the Bronx Zoo? Should she face trespassing charges? What about California’s own trespassing laws? Do the punishments fit the crime? Let us know what you think in the comments down below.


lynwood bail bonds california drunk in public laws

California Drunk in Public Laws

lynwood bail bonds california drunk in public laws

Most people like to go out and party from time to time. After all, it is nice to cut lose and forget about any responsibilities for the evening. Often times when people do this, they like to consume alcohol. There is nothing wrong with that. However, there are ways that people can get themselves into trouble with alcohol.

Everyone is aware of the obvious problems with drinking and driving, but there can also be problems for just being drunk and out in public. If a person is so drunk that they begin to risk their own safety or interfere with others, they can get into legal trouble.

California Penal Code 647f

California Penal Code (PC) 647 is the state’s law against disorderly conduct. This law covers things from begging for money to prostitution. One aspect of disorderly conduct that this law covers under section f is public intoxication.

PC 647f defines public intoxication as being any person in a public place who is under the influence of drugs, alcohol, or any other controlled substance and is in a condition where they are unable to exercise care for their own safety, or the safety of others. This includes things such as stumbling along the sidewalk, almost falling into the street, or even passing out on the sidewalk and blocking people from using it.

This law does not prevent a person from getting drunk while out on the town. What it is aimed at is preventing a person from getting so drunk that they could hurt themselves or someone else. To get to this level of drunk, a person usually has to overdo their drinking. So, in order to avoid getting into trouble a person needs to be aware of their limits and not push things while out in public.

Penalties of Being Drunk in Public

Breaking PC 647 is a misdemeanor offense. This means that a person faces the following consequences:

  • Up to 6 months in county jail.
  • A max fine of $1,000.

It is possible for a person to get probation instead of jail time for this crime, but that is up to the case judge.

No matter how a person is punished for this crime, it goes on their criminal record. There, it will be visible to any potential employers, which means a drunk in public charge could cost a person a future job. It is really in a person’s best interest to not overdo things and wind up in trouble with the law.

Don’t Overdo It

Whenever a person decides to go drinking, they need to do so responsibly. That means not drinking too much so they don’t get to the point that they can’t take care of themselves. If they do that, and are out in public, they can get into trouble with law enforcement for disorderly conduct. Nobody wants that, especially since it sticks around on a person’s criminal record. No one wants to miss out on a job because of something dumb they did a long time ago.

What do you think of California’s take on disorderly conduct and being drunk in public? Are the laws too lenient, or are they too strict? Let us know what you think in the comments down below.


We Don’t Need Collateral at Lynwood Bail Bonds

We Don’t Need Collateral at Lynwood Bail Bonds

We Don’t Need Collateral at Lynwood Bail Bonds

 

Paying for expensive things is tough enough on its own without additional stress being piled on. That is exactly what collateral does for buyers, it makes a purchase, or expense, more stressful. Not only does the person have to worry about making payments on time, they have the constant threat of losing something valuable of theirs if they fail to make a payment. Nobody wants that.

Collateral for big expenses, such as bail, have to have the same value as whatever money is owed. When the money owed is several thousands of dollars, the collateral is typically a house or car. Those are both items that people cannot afford to lose because they missed one payment. Unfortunately, many bail bond companies require their clients to post collateral.

At Lynwood Bail Bonds, we know how stressful worrying about collateral can be, which is why we don’t require it on most of our bonds. We prefer to trust our clients. All we need on most bonds is the signature of a working co-signer. As long as we have that, we have faith that our clients will make their payments on time.

On top of that, we at Lynwood Bail Bonds are more understanding with our clients and their payments in general. We know that things changes. Payments that might have been affordable a month ago may no longer be within reach. If that happens, our clients can talk to their bail agent before the payment is due, to see about changing their monthly payments.

  • 24/7 Bail bond service
  • 20% Discount
  • Phone approvals
  • 0% Interest payment plans
  • No hidden fees
  • No collateral with working signer
  • Se habla Español

Dealing with the arrest of a loved one can be a stressful time. At Lynwood Bail Bonds, we want to reduce that stress as much as possible. That is why we don’t ask for collateral on most of our bonds and why we are flexible with our clients’ payments. We care about our clients and do everything that we can to help them.

Want to get a bail bond without having to pledge collateral? Then contact the professionals by calling (323)357-0575 or clicking Chat With Us now.


Friendly Bail Help Anytime in California

Friendly Bail Help Anytime in California

Friendly Bail Help Anytime in California

 

When something bad happens, you turn to friendly and caring people that you can count on. This is especially true when you have been arrested. You want help from a friendly person. Luckily, finding a friendly bail agent is as simple as calling Downey Bail Bonds.

Since 1987, Downey Bail Bonds has provided Californians with caring and professional bail help. Our friendly bail agents are available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. They can be found all over the state of California and will be more than willing to help whenever you need them. They will answer your questions and help you understand the bail bond process.

Once you start talking to one of our bail agents, they begin working for you. Just give your bail agent your loved one’s name, birthday, and county of arrest. From there, our agents can use that information to locate your loved one in the county jail database. After that, they can begin filling out the paperwork for the bail bond.

With our bail agents working around the clock, your loved one will be out of jail in no time at all. Depending on the county of arrest, we can have your loved one out of jail in as little as two hours. That result depends on the county, but you can bet that our agents will do everything in their power to get your loved one out of jail quickly.

  • 20% Discount
  • 0% Interest payment plans
  • No hidden fees
  • No collateral with working signer
  • Se habla Español

At Downey Bail Bonds, we care about our clients and do a lot for them. We are always there to answer questions when they need us, but that is not all that we do. We provide affordable payment plans with no interest. We never charge hidden fees. Our clients can even be approved for a bail bond over the phone. When you need caring and friendly bail help, you can count on Downey Bail Bonds.

Are you looking for bail help? If so, get the best bail help in California by calling (323)357-0575 or clicking Chat With Us now.