lynwood bail bonds californias privacy laws

California’s Privacy Laws

lynwood bail bonds californias privacy laws

Everybody has a right to privacy, especially here in California. No one wants to deal with someone spying on them in private situations. That is why the state of California has a few different laws revolving around people’s right to privacy.

According to state law, there are certain areas where a person should be able to expect and receive privacy. Anyone who breaks that privacy can face legal consequences. California residents should be aware of these laws so that they don’t end up accidentally breaking them.

Laws about Recording People in California

California Penal Code (PC) 647 is the state’s disorderly conduct law. It covers all sorts of things from prostitution, aggressive begging, and invasion of privacy. Specifically, sections i and j of this law relate to privacy.

PC 647i refers to the act of peeping. Under this law, it is a crime for a person to linger, loiter, or prowl on someone’s private property and peek into the doors and windows of any inhabited structure. An example of this would be trespassing onto someone else’s property and then peeking into their home’s window to see if their home, or peeking into a bedroom to watch someone changing clothes.

PC 647j makes it a crime for any person to look into an area where a person would normally expect privacy. It doesn’t matter if a person uses their eyes, binoculars, a cellphone, or any other sort of device to look into the area. Areas where privacy is naturally expected include:

  • Bedrooms.
  • Bathrooms.
  • Changing rooms.
  • Tanning booths.
  • Any other room where one would reasonably expect privacy.

Examples of breaking this law would include recording someone in a bathroom or changing room, or even filming someone under their clothes.

Another law to consider when referring to privacy is California’s eavesdropping law, PC 632. California is considered a two-party consent state. This means that in order for a confidential conversation to be recorded, all parties involved need to give their consent. If a person records a private conversation without consent from everyone involved, they could face legal trouble.

Penalties of Invasion of Privacy

The penalties for invasion of privacy vary depending on which law was broken. For instance, both PC 647i & j fall under California’s disorderly conduct law. Both of these crimes are primarily charged as misdemeanors. This means they come with the following consequences:

  • Up to 6 months in county jail.
  • A max fine of $1,000.

However, if a person has been charged with an offense under PC 647j before, or the victim of the crime was under the age of 18, the charges increase to:

  • Up to 1 year in county jail.
  • A max fine of $2,000.

Meanwhile, PC 632 is known as a wobbler offense. This means it can either be charged as a misdemeanor or as a felony depending on the facts of the case and the accused’s criminal record. When charged as a misdemeanor, the person faces:

  • Up to 1 year in county jail.
  • A max fine of $2,500.

Meanwhile, felony eavesdropping charges can earn a person:

  • Up to 3 years in state prison.
  • A max fine of $2,500.

Don’t Record People in Private

In today’s modern world, where recording another person is so easily accomplished thanks to smart devices, knowing these laws is extra important. No one wants to end up in legal trouble for breaking a law they didn’t know about or understand. When it comes to recording people, whether it’s a conversation or a video, it is illegal to do so in situations where the recorded parties would normally expect privacy.

One key point to note is that law enforcement officers while on the job, are able to be recorded. This is due to the fact that they are civil employees and out in public where they would not normally expect privacy.

What do you think of California’s privacy laws surrounding recordings? Do you agree with them, or do you think they need to be modified? Let us know what you think in the comments down below.


lynwood bail bonds dui this thanksgiving

Don’t Get a DUI This Thanksgiving

lynwood bail bonds dui this thanksgiving

Halloween came and went and Thanksgiving will be here before you know it. The holiday season is upon us and that means a lot of parties, family, and drinking. This is a great time of year and is usually filled with lots of fun. Unfortunately, some people make a single decision that can ruin the festivities for everyone.

Alcohol is often very prominent at parties, and so naturally, people tend to get drunk at holiday parties. On its own, this is fine. The trouble comes when someone who has been drinking decides they are going to drive themselves home. They think things like they’re fine, or just buzzed, and then take their keys and leave. Sometimes they make it home. Other times they don’t.

Drunk Driving Is Illegal

Drinking and driving is illegal, and everyone knows that. However, people still do it anyways, and it is incredibly dangerous.

When a person has consumed alcohol, operating normally becomes difficult. Alcohol dulls the senses and distorts a person’s thinking. Due to this, when a person drives drunk, they are less capable of driving safely. They struggle to drive straight, stop properly, and avoid any surprises that are sent their way. This is why drunk drivers get into so many accidents.

Driving under the influence (DUI) is illegal in California under several different laws. The main law being Vehicle Code (VC) 23152. This law states that it is illegal for any person to drive a vehicle while under the influence of drugs or alcohol. This is especially true if the person has a blood alcohol concentration (BAC) of 0.08% or greater.

DUI Checkpoints

Law enforcement agencies are always keeping an eye out for drunk drivers. They want to get them off of the road as quickly as they can before an accident occurs. They will pull over any vehicle that they suspect may be driven by a drunk driver.

Around days where there tends to be a lot of partying, law enforcement agencies kick things up a notch. Instead of just waiting to stumble upon a drunk driver, they setup checkpoints near popular areas to try and catch the driver in the act.

DUI checkpoints are often posted in advance to give people plenty of warning and the option to avoid them if they want. At the checkpoint, cars will have to wait their turn to speak with an officer. When an officer is ready, they will signal for a driver to pull forward. From there, the officer will ask a few questions, such as:

  • Where are you going?
  • Where are you coming from?
  • Have you been drinking tonight?

The officer may even ask to see your license and registration. If everything checks out, the officer will let the driver proceed. However, if they suspect the person has been drinking, they will ask the driver to pullover to the side of the road. There, another officer will perform a field sobriety test. If they determine the driver has been drinking, then they will either arrest driver, or have him/her call for a sober ride home.

Penalties of DUI

The penalties for a DUI vary depending on whether or not this is the driver’s first DUI offense, and if someone was injured or not. For a first time DUI offense, a driver faces the following consequences:

  • Up to 6 months in county jail.
  • A max fine of $1,000.
  • Up to 9 months of DUI School.
  • A 4 month driver’s license suspension or 6 months with an ignition interlock device (IID) in the car.

A second time DUI offense comes with:

  • Up to 1 year in county jail.
  • A max fine of $1,000.
  • Up to 30 months of DUI School.
  • A 2 year driver’s license suspension or 1 year with an IID in the car.

When someone is injured due to a drunk driver, the person can face either misdemeanor or felony charges, depending on the severity of the injury. The consequences for misdemeanor DUI with an injury are:

  • Up to 1 year in county jail.
  • A max fine of $5,000.
  • Restitutions to the injured person.
  • Up to 30 months of DUI School.
  • A 1 year driver’s license suspension or 6 months with an IID in the car.

If a person is facing felony DUI with injury charges, they face the following consequences:

  • Up to 16 years in state prison.
  • A max fine of $5,000.
  • Restitutions to the injured person.
  • Up to 30 months of DUI School.
  • 1 year with an IID in the car.

If a person has acquired too many DUI convictions within the last 10 years, or their drunk driving killed someone, they will face felony DUI charges. This includes:

  • 16 months, 2 years, or 3 years in state prison.
  • A max fine of $1,000.
  • Up to 30 months of DUI School.
  • A 5 year driver’s license suspension.

While the consequences for felony DUI are lighter, it is important to remember that typically, DUI’s that result in death earn a person vehicular manslaughter charges, which carry much harsher consequences.

Don’t Ruin the Holidays with a DUI

Nobody wants their holiday ruined by a drunk driver hurting or killing someone they know and love, so it is best for anyone who is planning on drinking this holiday season to do so responsibly. This means that not only should a person know their limit with alcohol, they should have a ride home arranged before they begin drinking. The ride home could be a predetermined designated driver (DD), or a ride share service such as Uber or Lyft. A person could even hire a cab to take them home.

In the end, it doesn’t matter how the person gets home, as long as they did it safely, without driving under the influence.

What do you think of California’s DUI laws and DUI checkpoints? Do the laws and consequences matchup, or should they be adjusted? What about the checkpoints, do you think it is fair for the officers to disrupt traffic like that just to catch a few bad people? Let us know what you think in the comments below and have a safe Thanksgiving!


lynwood bail bonds trespassing at a zoo

Trespassing at a Zoo

lynwood bail bonds trespassing at a zoo

When going anywhere, it is important for a person to be sure that they have permission to be in that area. Privately owned property is everywhere, including public areas. Many people do not realize that places like stores and parks, even though open to the public, are actually private property. The land owner has simply given permission to the public to be in specific areas. This means that there are some areas that can be off limits to the general public.

There are obvious no-go areas such as employee lounges, or janitorial closest. One area that is definitely off-limits to everyone would be animal enclosures at zoos. This should be pretty obvious, but apparently not to everyone. One woman, while on a trip to the Bronx Zoo in New York, decided to climb into the lion enclosure to get the lion’s attention. Now police are looking for her.

Entering the Lion’s Den

At the start of October, video footage surfaced on social media platforms showing a woman who had climbed over the railing of a lion enclosure and was dancing and waving at a lion to get his attention. Needless to say, she got his attention.

Luckily for the woman, despite being inside the enclosure, there was a 15-foot moat separating him from her. Due to this fact, the woman remained unharmed.

The Bronx Zoo was alerted to the incident after it happened. The Zoo officials reminded everyone that it is never a good idea to enter an animal enclosure. Even though the animals are being held in captivity, they are still wild. The barriers are there to keep people and the animals safe.

Zoo officials contacted the police and informed them of the incident. Police are now looking for the woman to charge her with trespassing. This is due to the fact that even though the woman legally entered the zoo, she did not have permission to enter that enclosure.

California Trespassing Law

Here in the state of California, trespassing is defined and made illegal with Penal Code (PC) 602. As far as state law is concerned, someone is guilty of trespassing when they enter or remain on someone’s property without permission, or the right, to do so. Under this definition, the woman in the video would be guilty of trespassing if the incident had happened here in California.

PC 602 is unique in that it can be charged as an infraction, misdemeanor, or as a felony. When it’s an infraction, trespassing carries the following consequences:

  • A $75 fine for first time offenses
  • A $250 fine for a second time offense on the same land.
  • A third offense on the same land results in misdemeanor charges.

When PC 602 is charged as a misdemeanor, it carries the following consequences:

  • Up to 6 months in jail.
  • A max fine of $1,000.
  • Summary probation.

Felony charges of trespass occur when a person makes a credible threat against someone and within 30 days of making the threat trespasses with the intent of carrying out that threat. When a person does this, they can face jail time of:

  • 16 months.
  • 2 years.
  • 3 years.

Trespassing Is a Bad Idea

Trespassing is never a good idea. It’s entering someone’s private property without their permission. As such, a person can get into legal trouble for doing so. Entering a lion enclosure at a zoo is a terrible idea. Not only would it be trespassing, it is also incredibly dangerous. Lions can very easily kill a human.

What do you think of the woman who climbed into the lion enclosure at the Bronx Zoo? Should she face trespassing charges? What about California’s own trespassing laws? Do the punishments fit the crime? Let us know what you think in the comments down below.


lynwood bail bonds california and earthquakes

California and Earthquakes

lynwood bail bonds california and earthquakes

Here in California, there are a few different types of disasters that state residents have to be prepared for. One of the big ones is earthquakes. The San Andreas Fault Line runs through most of California, with hundreds of other smaller faults lacing the state. Due to this fact, every Californian needs to be prepared for an earthquake to occur at any time.

While scientists continue to study faults and earthquakes, there is still no proven method for predicting and forecasting earthquakes. An earthquake can occur at any time, and will do so without warning. If a person uses a specific app, they may be able to get a few seconds warning but that isn’t much.

The Great Shakeout

Each October, people from earthquake prone areas around the world participate in what is known as the Great Shakeout. The Great Shakeout is an organization with the goal of helping make sure everyone is prepared to deal with an earthquake. The group sets aside a day every year, for 2019 the date is October 17th, where people from around the world pledge to practice an earthquake drill.

Most people remember practicing earthquake drills back when they were in school. It wasn’t a whole lot of fun, and most people have stopped practicing that since graduating. This is a bad thing, since repetitive practice is what helps ensure a person remembers something even when scared or in a panic.

With the sudden nature of earthquakes, it is safe to assume that people will be scared and panicked when one occurs. However, with the proper practice, a person will be more than prepared to deal with one. That is why The Great Shakeout exists to help people be better prepared.

How to React

Most people are aware of the basic safety tips for earthquakes. When the shaking starts, and a person is indoors, they should drop, cover, and hold on. This means dropping to the ground, finding cover under a sturdy piece of furniture such as a desk or table, and then holding on until the shaking stops.

The same method applies for outdoors, though the person should first try to get away from any tall structures that could drop debris on them, then drop, cover, and hold on. While finding a safe, open space is important when outside during a quake, a person should be careful while walking through a quake so that they don’t hurt themselves.

If a person is in a vehicle when an earthquake hits, they should safely pullover to the side of the road in a clear location away from trees and power lines and wait for the shaking to stop. Once the shaking has stopped the person should proceed with caution. The road and other structures could be damaged. There can also be aftershocks.

For a more comprehensive collection of safety tips, check out one of our other articles on earthquakes here or check out the earthquake section of Ready.gov here.

Be Prepared

Living in California means living with earthquakes. The state is one of the most earthquake prone in the country, it is part of what gives the state all of its beautiful mountains. However, the sudden shaking can be very terrifying. The aftershocks following larger quakes can be nerve-wracking.

When it comes to dealing with earthquakes, the best thing a person can do is be prepared. A person can be prepared by knowing how to react during and after an earthquake. A simple way to do this is by identifying good places to take cover. Doing this before the need arises can really pay off when an earthquake actually occurs. Better ways to be prepared include regularly running earthquake drills and having emergency plans ready to go.

Interested in learning more about The Great Shakeout and how to join the movement, check out their website here.

Do you have any earthquake stories or tips you want to share? If so, leave a comment down below. You never know, maybe your story can help someone else.


lynwood bail bonds california drunk in public laws

California Drunk in Public Laws

lynwood bail bonds california drunk in public laws

Most people like to go out and party from time to time. After all, it is nice to cut lose and forget about any responsibilities for the evening. Often times when people do this, they like to consume alcohol. There is nothing wrong with that. However, there are ways that people can get themselves into trouble with alcohol.

Everyone is aware of the obvious problems with drinking and driving, but there can also be problems for just being drunk and out in public. If a person is so drunk that they begin to risk their own safety or interfere with others, they can get into legal trouble.

California Penal Code 647f

California Penal Code (PC) 647 is the state’s law against disorderly conduct. This law covers things from begging for money to prostitution. One aspect of disorderly conduct that this law covers under section f is public intoxication.

PC 647f defines public intoxication as being any person in a public place who is under the influence of drugs, alcohol, or any other controlled substance and is in a condition where they are unable to exercise care for their own safety, or the safety of others. This includes things such as stumbling along the sidewalk, almost falling into the street, or even passing out on the sidewalk and blocking people from using it.

This law does not prevent a person from getting drunk while out on the town. What it is aimed at is preventing a person from getting so drunk that they could hurt themselves or someone else. To get to this level of drunk, a person usually has to overdo their drinking. So, in order to avoid getting into trouble a person needs to be aware of their limits and not push things while out in public.

Penalties of Being Drunk in Public

Breaking PC 647 is a misdemeanor offense. This means that a person faces the following consequences:

  • Up to 6 months in county jail.
  • A max fine of $1,000.

It is possible for a person to get probation instead of jail time for this crime, but that is up to the case judge.

No matter how a person is punished for this crime, it goes on their criminal record. There, it will be visible to any potential employers, which means a drunk in public charge could cost a person a future job. It is really in a person’s best interest to not overdo things and wind up in trouble with the law.

Don’t Overdo It

Whenever a person decides to go drinking, they need to do so responsibly. That means not drinking too much so they don’t get to the point that they can’t take care of themselves. If they do that, and are out in public, they can get into trouble with law enforcement for disorderly conduct. Nobody wants that, especially since it sticks around on a person’s criminal record. No one wants to miss out on a job because of something dumb they did a long time ago.

What do you think of California’s take on disorderly conduct and being drunk in public? Are the laws too lenient, or are they too strict? Let us know what you think in the comments down below.


We Don’t Need Collateral at Lynwood Bail Bonds

We Don’t Need Collateral at Lynwood Bail Bonds

We Don’t Need Collateral at Lynwood Bail Bonds

 

Paying for expensive things is tough enough on its own without additional stress being piled on. That is exactly what collateral does for buyers, it makes a purchase, or expense, more stressful. Not only does the person have to worry about making payments on time, they have the constant threat of losing something valuable of theirs if they fail to make a payment. Nobody wants that.

Collateral for big expenses, such as bail, have to have the same value as whatever money is owed. When the money owed is several thousands of dollars, the collateral is typically a house or car. Those are both items that people cannot afford to lose because they missed one payment. Unfortunately, many bail bond companies require their clients to post collateral.

At Lynwood Bail Bonds, we know how stressful worrying about collateral can be, which is why we don’t require it on most of our bonds. We prefer to trust our clients. All we need on most bonds is the signature of a working co-signer. As long as we have that, we have faith that our clients will make their payments on time.

On top of that, we at Lynwood Bail Bonds are more understanding with our clients and their payments in general. We know that things changes. Payments that might have been affordable a month ago may no longer be within reach. If that happens, our clients can talk to their bail agent before the payment is due, to see about changing their monthly payments.

  • 24/7 Bail bond service
  • 20% Discount
  • Phone approvals
  • 0% Interest payment plans
  • No hidden fees
  • No collateral with working signer
  • Se habla Español

Dealing with the arrest of a loved one can be a stressful time. At Lynwood Bail Bonds, we want to reduce that stress as much as possible. That is why we don’t ask for collateral on most of our bonds and why we are flexible with our clients’ payments. We care about our clients and do everything that we can to help them.

Want to get a bail bond without having to pledge collateral? Then contact the professionals by calling (323)357-0575 or clicking Chat With Us now.


Friendly Bail Help Anytime in California

Friendly Bail Help Anytime in California

Friendly Bail Help Anytime in California

 

When something bad happens, you turn to friendly and caring people that you can count on. This is especially true when you have been arrested. You want help from a friendly person. Luckily, finding a friendly bail agent is as simple as calling Downey Bail Bonds.

Since 1987, Downey Bail Bonds has provided Californians with caring and professional bail help. Our friendly bail agents are available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. They can be found all over the state of California and will be more than willing to help whenever you need them. They will answer your questions and help you understand the bail bond process.

Once you start talking to one of our bail agents, they begin working for you. Just give your bail agent your loved one’s name, birthday, and county of arrest. From there, our agents can use that information to locate your loved one in the county jail database. After that, they can begin filling out the paperwork for the bail bond.

With our bail agents working around the clock, your loved one will be out of jail in no time at all. Depending on the county of arrest, we can have your loved one out of jail in as little as two hours. That result depends on the county, but you can bet that our agents will do everything in their power to get your loved one out of jail quickly.

  • 20% Discount
  • 0% Interest payment plans
  • No hidden fees
  • No collateral with working signer
  • Se habla Español

At Downey Bail Bonds, we care about our clients and do a lot for them. We are always there to answer questions when they need us, but that is not all that we do. We provide affordable payment plans with no interest. We never charge hidden fees. Our clients can even be approved for a bail bond over the phone. When you need caring and friendly bail help, you can count on Downey Bail Bonds.

Are you looking for bail help? If so, get the best bail help in California by calling (323)357-0575 or clicking Chat With Us now.


The Dangers of Drunk Driving

The Dangers of Drunk Driving

The Dangers of Drunk Driving

 

When it comes to any party holiday, it is safe to assume that there will be a lot of drinking. Under normal circumstances, drinking is fine. However, some people still think it is okay to consume alcohol and then get behind the wheel of a vehicle. When a person does that, they increase their chances of getting into a very serious accident that could kill someone.

According to Mothers Against Drunk Driving (MADD), a person is injured in a drunk driving accident every 2 minutes in the US. This number comes from a 2010 National Highway Traffic Safety Administration report. On top of that, an estimated 300,000 people drive drunk every single day in the US, and only around 2,800 people are arrested for the crime daily. These numbers have a tendency to go up around holidays that involve heavy partying and drinking.

 Drunk Driving and DUI Checkpoints

Driving drunk is illegal in every single state in the US. Alcohol greatly impairs a person’s ability to make decisions and to react in a timely manner. This means it severely reduces a person’s ability to drive. Drunk drivers struggle to drive straight, maintain a proper speed, and react appropriately to sudden changes.

In order to reduce the chances of people causing accidents while driving drunk, many law enforcement agencies setup DUI checkpoints. The hope is that these checkpoints will catch drunk drivers before they cause a deadly accident. While DUI checkpoints may cause some traffic congestion, they are done in an attempt to keep people safe.

DUI checkpoints are always posted in advanced, to give people the ability to avoid them if they want to. The checkpoint is usually setup in an area that will receive a lot of traffic, especially from bars and parties. Cars will pass through, one by one, and officer will speak with the driver of each vehicle. They will ask a few questions, such as:

  • License and registration.
  • Where are you coming from?
  • Where are you going?
  • Have you been drinking?

Once they have asked their questions, so long as they don’t suspect anything, the driver will be allowed to continue on their way. However, if the officer suspects that the driver has been drinking, they will be asked to pull over to the side where another officer will conduct a field sobriety test. If the driver fails that, they will either need to call for someone to come pick them up or sit in a drunk tank until they have sobered up.

 Marijuana and DUI

California recently legalized the recreational use of marijuana, and as such, some people are still fuzzy on what is and isn’t allowed with the drug. One of the big things that isn’t allowed, but most people think is okay, is driving while high. Some people don’t see a problem with it, but it can impair a person as much as alcohol can.

Marijuana can worsen a person’s reaction time, meaning they are less likely to be able to avoid an accident. High drivers also struggle with maintaining a proper speed, and suffer from impaired judgement.

The bottom line? Don’t drive high.

 Penalties of DUI

Some people don’t know that DUI stands for driving under the influence. This can mean driving under the influence of alcohol, marijuana, and even certain drug prescriptions. Since DUI can lead to very serious, even fatal accidents, law enforcement agencies take the crime very seriously.

A person accused of DUI can face the following consequences for a first time offense:

  • 6 months in county jail.
  • A max fine of $1,000.
  • A 6 month driver’s license suspension.
  • 3 – 9 months of DUI school.

 

Any following offenses come with harsher penalties, and if someone is severely hurt or killed because of a drunk driver, then that person will face felony charges, which for a first time offense includes:

  • 16 months to 16 years in state prison.
  • Anywhere from $1,000 to $5,000 in fines
  • Paying restitutions to the victim.
  • A suspended driver’s license or having an IID (Ignition Interlock Device) installed in their car for one year.
  • 18 to 30 months of DUI school.

 Don’t Drink and Drive

A person should never drive when they are drunk or high, and they especially shouldn’t do it around holidays. One such example would be Labor Day. For most people, it is a nice day off that gives them a three day weekend to enjoy with their friends and family members. Parties and barbeques can be found everywhere that weekend. This year, the holiday falls on Monday, September 2nd. Most of the celebrations will be taking place on Saturday or Sunday, leaving Monday for some recovering.

No matter how a person celebrates this upcoming holiday, or any other day for that matter, they should never get behind the wheel of a vehicle while drunk or high. With today’s technology, there are plenty of ways for a person to get home from taxis, Ubers, and Lyfts. A person can always find a safe way home. There is no excuse for driving drunk.


We Don’t Need Collateral with a Working Co-Signer

We Don’t Need Collateral with a Working Co-Signer

We Don’t Need Collateral with a Working Co-Signer

 

Whenever a person is making a large payment, or taking out a large loan, the seller or lender like to make sure that they will get all of the money owed to them. The most common way of doing this is by asking for collateral. This way, even if the money owed isn’t paid, the seller or lender still gets the money owed to them.

For collateral to work, the item pledged has to be equal in value to the amount of money owed. For larger purposes, this typically calls for houses, cars, property, or jewelry to be pledged. Due to this fact, people have different feelings about collateral, usually based on which side of the agreement they are one. Sellers like collateral for the security it provides, while buyers generally dislike collateral because of the extra burden it creates.

When it comes to bail, and it’s very high cost, many bail bond companies require collateral for their bail bonds. While this is great for the company, it is rough on the client who is already stressed enough dealing with the arrest of one of their loved ones. Unlike our competitors, we at Compton Bail Bonds understand this fact, which is why we do not require collateral on most of our bail bonds.

Here at Compton Bail Bonds, we prefer the signature of a working co-signer as collateral for the bail bond. This signature tells us that one of the people responsible for the bail bond is working and will continue to in order to pay off the bond. We prefer to trust our clients. Only in extreme cases will we ask for collateral for one of our bonds.

  • 24/7 Bail bond service
  • 20% Discount
  • Phone approvals
  • 0% Interest payment plans
  • No hidden fees
  • Se habla Español

Learning that someone was arrested can be a very stressful time. You do not want to add to that by having to worry about possibly losing your house or car as collateral. That is why you should come to Compton Bail Bonds for help. Our caring bail agents are always here to offer their assistance and we don’t require collateral.

Why risk more than you have to? Call (323)357-0575 or click Chat With Us now to talk with one of our bail agents.


Do You Need a Warrant Check in California?

Do You Need a Warrant Check in California?

Do You Need a Warrant Check in California?

 

Bailing someone out of jail is no fun, but here at Lynwood Bail Bonds we do everything that we can to help you. We will always help you get your loved ones out of jail, but that is not all that we do here. We also provide warrant checks for clients who need them. This way, if someone thinks there might be a warrant out for their arrest, they can find out for sure.

When a warrant is issued for a person’s arrest, no one notifies the person in question. If the police could find the person, then they would arrest him or her. If a person suspects that there may be a warrant out for their arrest, they usually have to go to the police station to see. If they do have a warrant, then they are arrested then and there, which isn’t optimal.

No one wants to get arrested, but if someone were to get arrested, they’d probably prefer to prepare for it first. Lynwood Bail Bonds lets you do that. When we perform a warrant check, if we find a warrant, we may be able to prepare a bail bond before the person turns themselves in, in some instances. This way, a person only stays in jail as long as it takes for them to be booked in, then they are bailed out.

While not all California counties allow us to perform warrant checks, the following do:

  • Contra Costa
  • Fresno
  • Kern
  • Riverside
  • Sacramento
  • San Bernardino
  • Stanislaus
  • Tulare

And sometimes:

  • Kings
  • San Juaquin

Even if we are unable to perform a warrant check for you, we can still get started on some of the bail paperwork. This can help expedite the bail process once a person is arrested, thereby shortening their stay behind bars.

When a person needs bail help, they should always contact Lynwood Bail Bonds. When a person thinks there might be a warrant out for their arrest, they can contact Lynwood Bail Bonds for help with that as well.

Do you need to talk to one of our agents? Consultations are free, so just call (323)357-0575 or click Chat With Us now.